A Mandate for Israel

The ultimate success of the current Arab-Israeli negotiations will hinge on how they deal with the legal and moral essence of the conflict: the longstanding Arab legal and moral arguments used to oppose Zionism and Israel.

Issue: Fall 1993

Has a conflict evolved into peace when fighting between the opposing
armies has ceased? In one sense, yes; but a cease-fire, or even a
formal armistice, falls short of true peace. Should the description
"true peace" be reserved until the antagonists have signed treaties
requiring exchanges of ambassadors and other visible signs of
"normal" relations? Perhaps, but again the essence of peace is not
paper. Neither is it embassies, business deals or tourism. Vicious
wars--including World Wars I and II--have erupted between countries
actively engaged with each other in diplomacy, trade and cultural
exchanges.

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