Advancing American Interests and the US-Russian Relationship. The Commission on America's National Interests and Russia

The public reconciliation of Presidents Bush and Putin in St.

Issue: Fall 2003

The public reconciliation of Presidents Bush and Putin in St. Petersburg and at the G-8 Summit in Evian and the ongoing relationship (evidenced by the meetings at Camp David this past weekend) has fostered the impression that all is well in the U.S.-Russian relationship.  This is a dangerous misimpression.  The U.S.-Russian dispute over Iraq exposed conflicts in the U.S.-Russian relationship and even cracks in its foundation that must be addressed to advance vital American interests.

The tragic attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon rapidly crystallized American thinking about the interrelated threats of terrorism and proliferation.  Containing these threats has become the principal aim of U.S. foreign policy.  Today's Russia can play a major role in advancing this aim-or in undermining it. 

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