Courting Danger

Advocates of a permanent international court to try perpetrators of war crimes and other "crimes against humanity" achieved a major success in July 1997.

Issue: Winter 1998-1999

Advocates of a permanent international court to try perpetrators of
war crimes and other "crimes against humanity" achieved a major
success in July 1997, with the adoption of a multilateral agreement
called "the Statute of Rome." This treaty will enter into force after
ratification by sixty states (which is expected to occur in 1999 or
soon thereafter), creating the first new global juridical institution
since the International Court of Justice (ICJ) in 1945. In the eyes
of its supporters, the nascent International Criminal Court (ICC) is
simply an overdue addition to the family of international
organizations, an evolutionary step up from the Nuremberg tribunal,
and the next logical institutional development over the ad hoc war
crimes courts in Bosnia and Rwanda.

You must be a subscriber of The National Interest to access this article. If you are already a subscriber, please activate your online access. Not a subscriber? Become a subscriber today!