Gone to the Lake: Republicans and Foreign Policy

In a July 1995 speech before an enraptured audience assembled atWashington's Center for Strategic and International Studies, HouseSpeaker Newt Gingrich addressed the broad issues of post-Cold WarU.

Issue: Summer 1996

In a July 1995 speech before an enraptured audience assembled at
Washington's Center for Strategic and International Studies, House
Speaker Newt Gingrich addressed the broad issues of post-Cold War
U.S. foreign policy. His address was typically multi-layered and
brimming with new age facilitator-speak phrases such as "appreciative
understanding" and "complex decentralized system" that normally--and
mercifully--find no place in the vocabulary of foreign affairs. In
retrospect, however, one simple example of southern vernacular stood
out. Trying to explain the vicissitudes of American diplomacy to the
many puzzled foreign diplomats present, Gingrich said that when we
Americans are not excited about the world, we "go to the lake."

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