Letters

Too often, the Beltway conventional wisdom emerges without careful scrutiny, before the hard questions have been asked.

Issue: Winter 2005-2006

Too often, the Beltway conventional wisdom emerges without careful scrutiny, before the hard questions have been asked. We are convinced this is the case with the thesis that the United States must reform failed states, represented most recently in Brent Scowcroft and Sandy Berger's article, "In the Wake of War" (Fall 2005).

The conventional wisdom asserts that failed states pose a grave danger to the United States, and the threat has grown more acute in the post-9/11 environment. In Scowcroft and Berger's formulation, "action to stabilize and rebuild states emerging from conflict is not 'foreign policy as social work', a favorite quip of the 1990s. It is equally a national security priority."

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