Mexico and the Politics of Free Trade

When it is negotiated and if it is approved by Congress, the North American Free Trade Agreement between the United States, Mexico, and Canada may prove to be the most important foreign economic policy achievement of President Bush's first term in of

Issue: Fall 1991

When it is negotiated and if it is approved by Congress, the North American Free Trade Agreement between the United States, Mexico, and Canada may prove to be the most important foreign economic policy achievement of President Bush's first term in office.  This is especially true if there is a failure in the Uruguay Round negotiations to repair the world trading system under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade.  The North American agreement, known as NAFTA, will create a free-trade zone nearly equal in population to the European Community and nearly double that of Japan's emerging ``yen bloc'' in East Asia--and larger than either in economic terms.  Administration officials hope that NAFTA will form the basis of a free-trade community of market democracies encompassing the entire Western Hemisphere, and will help promote capitalism, democracy, and free trade globally.  That would make it a veritable pillar of Bush's New World Order.

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