No Brakes, No Compass

LEON HOLLERMAN's preceding account of Japan's global strategy makes it easier to talk about what remains a conceptually elusive and controversial phenomenon: Japanese international power.

Issue: Fall 1991

LEON HOLLERMAN's preceding account of Japan's global strategy makes it easier to talk about what remains a conceptually elusive and controversial phenomenon: Japanese international power. The ``headquarters nation'' idea explains much.  The description of Japan's ``adversarial investment'' is timely since it has already become much more significant than what, five years ago, Peter Drucker very usefully defined as ``adversarial trade.''  Hollerman's account also prompts intriguing questions: What will Japan's ``outflanking strategy'' ultimately lead to?  Does the campaign to create a global economic headquarters country constitute a viable policy?  Is it the actual intention of Japan's political elite to run the world in times of peace?  If so, can it be sure of the consent of the world, and especially of the United States?

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