Russia's Crisis, America's Complicity

The appointment of the Primakov government in September reflects profound changes in Russian politics, some of which have serious implications for the United States.

Issue: Winter 1998-1999

The appointment of the Primakov government in September represents
more than a change in personalities or a shift in Russian economic
policy. It reflects profound changes in Russian politics, some of
which have serious implications for the United States.

Since its first days in office the Clinton administration has made
"strategic partnership" with Russia a focal point of its foreign
policy. But the administration's interpretation of strategic
partnership has gone far beyond what is conventional in
state-to-state relations. It has included de facto intervention in
Russia's domestic politics on behalf of President Boris Yeltsin and
the so-called "radical reformers", particularly former acting Prime
Minister Yegor Gaidar and former First Deputy Prime Minister Anatoly
Chubais.

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