Supping with Devils

The Cambodian ceasefire accord, reached in June at a meeting of the warring Cambodian parties at the Thai beach resort of Pattaya, was a promising step toward settlement of the country's long and bloody conflict.

Issue: Fall 1991

The Cambodian ceasefire accord, reached in June at a meeting of the warring Cambodian parties at the Thai beach resort of Pattaya, was a promising step toward settlement of the country's long and bloody conflict.  The Communist regime in Phnom Penh and the three resistance groups arrayed against it (Sihanouk's National Army, the Khmer People's National Liberation Front, and the Communist Khmer Rouge) agreed to make a functioning reality of the Supreme National Council--representing all of them--that was called for in a United Nations peace plan last year.  The Council convened in Beijing in July under the chairmanship of Prince Norodom Sihanouk.  In principle, foreign arms supply to all sides is to stop and the UN is to play an important role in managing a transition to free elections.  Many issues remain to be settled, however.

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