The End of Multiculturalism

From its Iraq policy to immigration, the Bush Administration fell victim to multicultural thinking. Until policymakers take culture seriously, we'll continue to make mistakes.

Issue: Jan-Feb 2008

Harrison

FUTURE GENERATIONS may look back on Iraq and immigration as the two great disasters of the Bush presidency. Ironically, for a conservative administration, both of these policy initiatives were rooted in a multicultural view of the world.

Since the 1960s, multiculturalism, the idea that all cultures are essentially equal, has become a dominant feature of the political and intellectual landscape of the West. It has profoundly influenced Iraq War policy, the policy of democracy promotion, international development agendas and immigration policy, with consequences for the cultural composition of societies.

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