The Many Faces of Neo-Marxism

The German thinker's name has been attached to a wide range of modern ideas—poststructuralism, postmodernism, gender studies, etc.—yet he was more a man of his day than of ours.

Issue: May-June 2013

WE ARE told these days that Karl Marx—one of the most influential thinkers of the nineteenth century, if not the single most important one—is enjoying a kind of renaissance. This is attributed by some to the great economic crisis that began in 2008 and destroyed considerable wealth around the world. Given that this crisis is seen widely as a crisis of capitalism, it is natural that many people would think of Marx, who was of course the greatest critic of capitalism in history.

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