The Prudent Irishman: Edmund Burke's Realism

One of the many consequences of communism's collapse is disarray in the conceptual structures of American foreign policy. Without a clear focal point, one-time hawks now flap like doves, while erstwhile doves behave like birds of prey. The strateg

Issue: Winter 1997-1998

One of the many consequences of Soviet communism's collapse is disarray in the conceptual structures of American foreign policy. Left without a clear focal point, one-time hawks now flap like doves, while erstwhile doves behave like birds of prey. Both the strategic role and the moral purposes of the United States in the world are disputed. For conservatives it is a matter of special concern that confusion exists with particular starkness among those who once held common views as "anti-communists."

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