Weisberg on Fukuyama's South Africa

Every student of international relations has thought about the question of why world communism fell apart when it did.

Issue: Fall 1991

Every student of international relations has thought about the question of why world communism fell apart when it did.  Fewer have considered the sudden and dramatic collapse of another totalitarian bulwark which many deemed equally impregnable before 1989: the South African apartheid state.  In his fine overview of recent developments and future scenarios ("The Next South Africa," Summer 1991), Francis Fukuyama offers many insights into the causes of this other democratic revolution, and helps explicate its relationship to events in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe that overshadowed it.  

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