Blogs: Paul Pillar

Trump, Afghanistan, and Shades of the Tuesday Lunch

Palestine and the New Peacemakers

Truth-Killing as a Meta-Issue

Paul Pillar

One hundred days is enough time for the Trumpian assault on truth to start to become institutionalized.  The process has become plain at the website of the Environmental Protection Agency.  Changes at the website since Trump’s inauguration include not only what would be expected after a change of administrations in keeping any policy statements consistent with the new regime’s preferences; it also has involved expunging the truth.  Specifically, a section of the site that had existed for 20 years and provided detailed data and scientific information on climate change has been removed.  The deleted site, according to climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe of Texas Tech University, included “important summaries of climate science and indicators that clearly and unmistakably explain and document the impacts we are having on our planet.”  The site was a go-to place for authoritative information about climate change.  This is the sort of service one should expect to get from a government agency such as EPA (just like, before I took some recent foreign travel, the website of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention served as a go-to site for authoritative information about what inoculations I would need).  Now that part of the EPA site is gone.

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt approved the deletion because, according to an anonymous staffer under Pruitt, “we can’t have information which contradicts the actions we have taken in the last two months”.  So instead of defending those actions in a well-informed policy debate based on truth, the administration’s approach was to delete the truth.  If the policy doesn’t conform with reality, then deny the reality and make it as hard as possible for citizens to be informed of the reality.

Orwell’s Ministry of Truth may be closer than we thought. 

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Diverting Attention from the Tragedy of Palestine

Paul Pillar

One hundred days is enough time for the Trumpian assault on truth to start to become institutionalized.  The process has become plain at the website of the Environmental Protection Agency.  Changes at the website since Trump’s inauguration include not only what would be expected after a change of administrations in keeping any policy statements consistent with the new regime’s preferences; it also has involved expunging the truth.  Specifically, a section of the site that had existed for 20 years and provided detailed data and scientific information on climate change has been removed.  The deleted site, according to climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe of Texas Tech University, included “important summaries of climate science and indicators that clearly and unmistakably explain and document the impacts we are having on our planet.”  The site was a go-to place for authoritative information about climate change.  This is the sort of service one should expect to get from a government agency such as EPA (just like, before I took some recent foreign travel, the website of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention served as a go-to site for authoritative information about what inoculations I would need).  Now that part of the EPA site is gone.

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt approved the deletion because, according to an anonymous staffer under Pruitt, “we can’t have information which contradicts the actions we have taken in the last two months”.  So instead of defending those actions in a well-informed policy debate based on truth, the administration’s approach was to delete the truth.  If the policy doesn’t conform with reality, then deny the reality and make it as hard as possible for citizens to be informed of the reality.

Orwell’s Ministry of Truth may be closer than we thought. 

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Destroying the Planet, and U.S. Leadership Along With It

Paul Pillar

One hundred days is enough time for the Trumpian assault on truth to start to become institutionalized.  The process has become plain at the website of the Environmental Protection Agency.  Changes at the website since Trump’s inauguration include not only what would be expected after a change of administrations in keeping any policy statements consistent with the new regime’s preferences; it also has involved expunging the truth.  Specifically, a section of the site that had existed for 20 years and provided detailed data and scientific information on climate change has been removed.  The deleted site, according to climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe of Texas Tech University, included “important summaries of climate science and indicators that clearly and unmistakably explain and document the impacts we are having on our planet.”  The site was a go-to place for authoritative information about climate change.  This is the sort of service one should expect to get from a government agency such as EPA (just like, before I took some recent foreign travel, the website of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention served as a go-to site for authoritative information about what inoculations I would need).  Now that part of the EPA site is gone.

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt approved the deletion because, according to an anonymous staffer under Pruitt, “we can’t have information which contradicts the actions we have taken in the last two months”.  So instead of defending those actions in a well-informed policy debate based on truth, the administration’s approach was to delete the truth.  If the policy doesn’t conform with reality, then deny the reality and make it as hard as possible for citizens to be informed of the reality.

Orwell’s Ministry of Truth may be closer than we thought. 

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