Blogs: Paul Pillar

Syria: Still a No-Win Situation

The Paris Agreement and Trump at his Worst

Paul Pillar

As citizens brace and prepare for three years and seven plus months more of this, the problem of climate change itself should be at the top of issues that require not just bracing and preparation but also creative thinking about how to deal with the issue as long as this kind of destructive force is in control of the U.S. government.  A reminder is in order that Americans are citizens not only of the United States but also of states, localities, and civil society and also—uniquely important to this issue—citizens of the world, the same world that climate change endangers.  Regarding the smaller units, what states, cities, and the private sector are doing to transition to clean energy deserves all the support it can get.  Regarding citizenship of the world, Americans will have to consider carefully how to respond to the rest of the world’s response to the irresponsibility on this issue in Washington.  The responsible posture may entail not just respect and understanding but also support for some of those responses.  Martin Wolf of the Financial Times has even written about sanctions as a response to U.S. withdrawal from the Paris agreement.  More plausible, more worthy of support from individual Americans, defensible under the rules of the World Trade Organization, and already talked about among foreign government officials, would be a carbon tariff applied to U.S. exports.

Our children and grandchildren, feeling increasingly the effects of climate change, will read about what Trump did and wonder how our generation could have placed such a small-minded man in such a position of power with such lasting and damaging consequences.

Image: Donald Trump at CPAC 2011 in Washington, DC. Flickr / Gage Skidmore

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Dozing Off on the Way to Planetary Ruin

Paul Pillar

As citizens brace and prepare for three years and seven plus months more of this, the problem of climate change itself should be at the top of issues that require not just bracing and preparation but also creative thinking about how to deal with the issue as long as this kind of destructive force is in control of the U.S. government.  A reminder is in order that Americans are citizens not only of the United States but also of states, localities, and civil society and also—uniquely important to this issue—citizens of the world, the same world that climate change endangers.  Regarding the smaller units, what states, cities, and the private sector are doing to transition to clean energy deserves all the support it can get.  Regarding citizenship of the world, Americans will have to consider carefully how to respond to the rest of the world’s response to the irresponsibility on this issue in Washington.  The responsible posture may entail not just respect and understanding but also support for some of those responses.  Martin Wolf of the Financial Times has even written about sanctions as a response to U.S. withdrawal from the Paris agreement.  More plausible, more worthy of support from individual Americans, defensible under the rules of the World Trade Organization, and already talked about among foreign government officials, would be a carbon tariff applied to U.S. exports.

Our children and grandchildren, feeling increasingly the effects of climate change, will read about what Trump did and wonder how our generation could have placed such a small-minded man in such a position of power with such lasting and damaging consequences.

Image: Donald Trump at CPAC 2011 in Washington, DC. Flickr / Gage Skidmore

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Trump Is No Realist

Paul Pillar

As citizens brace and prepare for three years and seven plus months more of this, the problem of climate change itself should be at the top of issues that require not just bracing and preparation but also creative thinking about how to deal with the issue as long as this kind of destructive force is in control of the U.S. government.  A reminder is in order that Americans are citizens not only of the United States but also of states, localities, and civil society and also—uniquely important to this issue—citizens of the world, the same world that climate change endangers.  Regarding the smaller units, what states, cities, and the private sector are doing to transition to clean energy deserves all the support it can get.  Regarding citizenship of the world, Americans will have to consider carefully how to respond to the rest of the world’s response to the irresponsibility on this issue in Washington.  The responsible posture may entail not just respect and understanding but also support for some of those responses.  Martin Wolf of the Financial Times has even written about sanctions as a response to U.S. withdrawal from the Paris agreement.  More plausible, more worthy of support from individual Americans, defensible under the rules of the World Trade Organization, and already talked about among foreign government officials, would be a carbon tariff applied to U.S. exports.

Our children and grandchildren, feeling increasingly the effects of climate change, will read about what Trump did and wonder how our generation could have placed such a small-minded man in such a position of power with such lasting and damaging consequences.

Image: Donald Trump at CPAC 2011 in Washington, DC. Flickr / Gage Skidmore

Pages

Costs of the Clenched Fist

Paul Pillar

As citizens brace and prepare for three years and seven plus months more of this, the problem of climate change itself should be at the top of issues that require not just bracing and preparation but also creative thinking about how to deal with the issue as long as this kind of destructive force is in control of the U.S. government.  A reminder is in order that Americans are citizens not only of the United States but also of states, localities, and civil society and also—uniquely important to this issue—citizens of the world, the same world that climate change endangers.  Regarding the smaller units, what states, cities, and the private sector are doing to transition to clean energy deserves all the support it can get.  Regarding citizenship of the world, Americans will have to consider carefully how to respond to the rest of the world’s response to the irresponsibility on this issue in Washington.  The responsible posture may entail not just respect and understanding but also support for some of those responses.  Martin Wolf of the Financial Times has even written about sanctions as a response to U.S. withdrawal from the Paris agreement.  More plausible, more worthy of support from individual Americans, defensible under the rules of the World Trade Organization, and already talked about among foreign government officials, would be a carbon tariff applied to U.S. exports.

Our children and grandchildren, feeling increasingly the effects of climate change, will read about what Trump did and wonder how our generation could have placed such a small-minded man in such a position of power with such lasting and damaging consequences.

Image: Donald Trump at CPAC 2011 in Washington, DC. Flickr / Gage Skidmore

Pages

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