The Buzz

The Forgotten Story of How the F-22 and F-35 Were Born

On August 27, 1939, a stubby-winged airplane made of unpainted steel alloy took off over Germany and soared into history. Instead of a pointy propeller hub in the nose, the Heinkel 178 had an open-mouthed turbojet intake, making it the first operational jet-powered aircraft.

The He 178 could only attain 380 miles per hour—only 10 percent faster than the Messerschmitt 109E piston-engine fighters then in service. Nearly eighty years after the Heinkel jet’s first flight, fourth- and fifth-generation jet fighters are capable of flying well over 1,500 miles per hour, can launch guided missiles at enemy fighters dozens of miles away, and carry bombloads that far exceed the capacity of the four-engine strategic bombers of World War II.

How did we get from the He 178 to a beast like the F-22 Raptor?

First Generation: Figuring Out Jet Design

Turbojets generate thrust by compressing air, mixing it with fuel and blasting the explosive results through a turbine. However, early jet prototypes like the He 178, the American P-59 and the British E.28/39 were not much faster than contemporary piston-engine fighters.

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It wasn’t until 1944 when Germany deployed the twin-turbojet engine Messerschmitt Me-262 into combat. With a maximum speed of 540 miles per hour, the 262 could easily outrun Allied fighters, but Nazi Germany lacked the industrial capacity and fuel supplies to put many into service. The only other country to combat deploys jets in World War II was the United Kingdom, though its Gloster Meteor was relegated to shooting down V-1 cruise missiles.

Early subsonic jets like the P-80 and F-84 were limited by the use of straight wings perpendicular to the fuselage. However, at speeds approaching or exceeding the speed of sound, swept-back wings help delay drag-inducing shockwaves. By the Korean War in 1950, American and Communist forces were flying agile swept-wing F-86 Sabre and MiG-15 fighters up to just below the speed of 680 miles per hour.

However, the air battles over Korea were still fought in a way similar to those of World War II, with pilots engaging in swirling dogfights using machine guns and cannons. This would soon change.

Second Generation: Supersonic and Specialized

On October 14, 1947, Chuck Yeager blasted over the sound barrier, flying a needle-nosed Bell X-1 test plane painted orange-red. By the 1950s, jet fighters were being designed for supersonic flight using new afterburners that temporarily injected fuel directly into the jet pipe, bypassing the turbine.

These second-generation jet fighters were specialized according to the prevailing grim expectations of horrifying nuclear war. On one hand, designers developed extremely fast (but not very maneuverable) interceptors like the Soviet Sukhoi Su-9, the British Electric Lightning, the delta-winged French Mirage III and the American Lockheed F-104 Starfighters. These were intended to quickly zip up to enemy strategic bombers and knock them out of the sky before they could drop their nuclear payloads.

The interceptors increasingly came with onboard radars—formerly reserved for specialized night fighters and antisubmarine planes—and could use early, primitive guided missiles. These included longer-range radar-guided weapons, some even bearing nuclear warheads, and short-range heat seekers that were effective when pointed at the rear exhaust of enemy aircraft. The first air-to-air missile kill was scored in 1958, when a Taiwanese F-86 used a heat-seeking AIM-9B Sidewinder to splash a Chinese MiG-17 over the straits of Taiwan.

At the same time, the Cold War adversaries foresaw massive land battles on the frontlines of the Cold War, and developed short-range fighter-bombers to strafe ground targets and shoot down rival tactical aircraft.Notable supersonic examples included the F-100 Super Sabre and the MiG-19, but sturdy subsonic ground-attack jets like the A-4 Skyhawk and Su-7 also saw extensive action.

Third Generation: Heavy, Fast, Sophisticated and . . . Clumsy

By the 1960s, it became increasingly clear that the days of high-flying strategic bombers were numbered, thanks to long-range surface-to-air missiles. Therefore, demand for specialized interceptors waned as well, though the Soviets continued to build Su-15 and Tu-128 interceptors to guard their vast frontiers. Instead, designers focused on powerful new jets that could do it all by leveraging early analog computer systems, new in-flight refueling technology and better air-to-air missiles.

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