Blogs: The Buzz

North Korea Could Easily Nuke Tokyo (the Largest Urban Area on the Planet)

The Buzz

Tokyo has a population of 13.491 million, making it by far the largest city in Japan and home to more than 10 percent of the nation’s population. The greater Tokyo area, home to thirty-seven million, is the largest urban area on the planet. It is also squarely in the crosshairs of North Korea’s nuclear weapons. In the event of nuclear attack, Tokyo could experience enormous destruction the likes of which it hasn’t experienced since World War II.

Tokyo became the capital of modern Japan in the late nineteenth century, during the Meiji Restoration, part of a broad effort to modernize the country and raise the Japan’s government, science, technology and military to Western levels. Unfortunately, imperialism was one of those imported values, and the country ruled the Korean Peninsula from 1910 to 1945. The occupation and guerrilla war conducted by Korean partisans established a deep antagonism against Japan that persists to this day. The North Korean leadership claims legitimacy in part from the partisan activities conducted by founding members of the state. Japan’s later alliance with the United States and South Korea only exacerbated bad feelings against the country in Pyongyang.

Recommended: Stealth vs. North Korea’s Air Defenses: Who Wins?

Recommended: America’s Battleships Went to War Against North Korea

Recommended: 5 Places World War III Could Start in 2018

Despite such history, in practical terms Japan has only been a secondary player to Pyongyang, with the real enemy being the United States. Kim Il-sung, founder of the North Korean state and grandfather to current leader Kim Jong-un, set a goal of building long-range missiles to strike Japan—not for striking Japan per se, but for striking American military bases there that would be key to a new Korean conflict. Kim wanted a way to strike bases that would host or coordinate the kind of American airpower that flattened Pyongyang during the war.

Most American bases in Japan are near urban areas, a consequence of Japan’s shortage of useful land. The U.S. Air Force has also closed other bases such as Tachikawa Air Base, which was located in the western part of Tokyo. One base in particular, however, that would very likely be struck by North Korean nuclear weapons is Yokota Air Base.

Yokota Air Base is home to fourteen thousand American servicemen and women. It is home to the headquarters for U.S. Forces Japan and an airlift wing, and is a vital operations, transportation and medical base for the U.S. military in East Asia. It is also the location of the Japan Air Self Defense Force’s Air Defense Command, and a base from which U.S. Air Force B-29 bombers staged attacks on North Korean targets during the Korean War.

In the event of war, some experts are convinced that North Korea would launch a broad nuclear attack designed to shock its enemies, prove a will to use its nuclear arsenal and warn enemies not to provoke further attacks. Yokota, a joint U.S.-Japanese base with a history of hosting attacks against the North Korean people, would almost certainly become a target.

What would happen if Yokota was struck with a North Korean nuclear weapon? Using NUKEMAP, an online tool developed by nuclear-weapons scholar Alex Wellerstein, we can gain some kind of idea. For the purpose of this exercise, we’ll assume North Korea is able to fit a twenty-kiloton nuclear warhead into a medium-range ballistic missile such as the Pukkuksong-2 missile and accurately deliver the weapon to the Yokota Air Base tarmac.

NUKEMAP provides ballpark guesses on a variety of nuclear-weapons effects, including thermal, overpressure and fallout effects, over various distances from the location of the detonation. In the case of Yokota, casualty estimates for a device 25 percent more powerful than the one detonated at Hiroshima are surprisingly mild: 12,800 killed outright and 45,460 injured. While this might seem unusual, the base is fairly large and very few people live or work on the flight line. A swathe of radioactive fallout would fall like a shadow to the northeast, across Saitama Prefecture and towards Ibaraki Prefecture, but generally avoiding metropolitan Tokyo.

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Turkey May Try to Build an Unmanned Tank

The Buzz

Tokyo has a population of 13.491 million, making it by far the largest city in Japan and home to more than 10 percent of the nation’s population. The greater Tokyo area, home to thirty-seven million, is the largest urban area on the planet. It is also squarely in the crosshairs of North Korea’s nuclear weapons. In the event of nuclear attack, Tokyo could experience enormous destruction the likes of which it hasn’t experienced since World War II.

Tokyo became the capital of modern Japan in the late nineteenth century, during the Meiji Restoration, part of a broad effort to modernize the country and raise the Japan’s government, science, technology and military to Western levels. Unfortunately, imperialism was one of those imported values, and the country ruled the Korean Peninsula from 1910 to 1945. The occupation and guerrilla war conducted by Korean partisans established a deep antagonism against Japan that persists to this day. The North Korean leadership claims legitimacy in part from the partisan activities conducted by founding members of the state. Japan’s later alliance with the United States and South Korea only exacerbated bad feelings against the country in Pyongyang.

Recommended: Stealth vs. North Korea’s Air Defenses: Who Wins?

Recommended: America’s Battleships Went to War Against North Korea

Recommended: 5 Places World War III Could Start in 2018

Despite such history, in practical terms Japan has only been a secondary player to Pyongyang, with the real enemy being the United States. Kim Il-sung, founder of the North Korean state and grandfather to current leader Kim Jong-un, set a goal of building long-range missiles to strike Japan—not for striking Japan per se, but for striking American military bases there that would be key to a new Korean conflict. Kim wanted a way to strike bases that would host or coordinate the kind of American airpower that flattened Pyongyang during the war.

Most American bases in Japan are near urban areas, a consequence of Japan’s shortage of useful land. The U.S. Air Force has also closed other bases such as Tachikawa Air Base, which was located in the western part of Tokyo. One base in particular, however, that would very likely be struck by North Korean nuclear weapons is Yokota Air Base.

Yokota Air Base is home to fourteen thousand American servicemen and women. It is home to the headquarters for U.S. Forces Japan and an airlift wing, and is a vital operations, transportation and medical base for the U.S. military in East Asia. It is also the location of the Japan Air Self Defense Force’s Air Defense Command, and a base from which U.S. Air Force B-29 bombers staged attacks on North Korean targets during the Korean War.

In the event of war, some experts are convinced that North Korea would launch a broad nuclear attack designed to shock its enemies, prove a will to use its nuclear arsenal and warn enemies not to provoke further attacks. Yokota, a joint U.S.-Japanese base with a history of hosting attacks against the North Korean people, would almost certainly become a target.

What would happen if Yokota was struck with a North Korean nuclear weapon? Using NUKEMAP, an online tool developed by nuclear-weapons scholar Alex Wellerstein, we can gain some kind of idea. For the purpose of this exercise, we’ll assume North Korea is able to fit a twenty-kiloton nuclear warhead into a medium-range ballistic missile such as the Pukkuksong-2 missile and accurately deliver the weapon to the Yokota Air Base tarmac.

NUKEMAP provides ballpark guesses on a variety of nuclear-weapons effects, including thermal, overpressure and fallout effects, over various distances from the location of the detonation. In the case of Yokota, casualty estimates for a device 25 percent more powerful than the one detonated at Hiroshima are surprisingly mild: 12,800 killed outright and 45,460 injured. While this might seem unusual, the base is fairly large and very few people live or work on the flight line. A swathe of radioactive fallout would fall like a shadow to the northeast, across Saitama Prefecture and towards Ibaraki Prefecture, but generally avoiding metropolitan Tokyo.

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The Marine Corps May Finally Get a New Sniper Rifle—Just Not the One They Need

The Buzz

Tokyo has a population of 13.491 million, making it by far the largest city in Japan and home to more than 10 percent of the nation’s population. The greater Tokyo area, home to thirty-seven million, is the largest urban area on the planet. It is also squarely in the crosshairs of North Korea’s nuclear weapons. In the event of nuclear attack, Tokyo could experience enormous destruction the likes of which it hasn’t experienced since World War II.

Tokyo became the capital of modern Japan in the late nineteenth century, during the Meiji Restoration, part of a broad effort to modernize the country and raise the Japan’s government, science, technology and military to Western levels. Unfortunately, imperialism was one of those imported values, and the country ruled the Korean Peninsula from 1910 to 1945. The occupation and guerrilla war conducted by Korean partisans established a deep antagonism against Japan that persists to this day. The North Korean leadership claims legitimacy in part from the partisan activities conducted by founding members of the state. Japan’s later alliance with the United States and South Korea only exacerbated bad feelings against the country in Pyongyang.

Recommended: Stealth vs. North Korea’s Air Defenses: Who Wins?

Recommended: America’s Battleships Went to War Against North Korea

Recommended: 5 Places World War III Could Start in 2018

Despite such history, in practical terms Japan has only been a secondary player to Pyongyang, with the real enemy being the United States. Kim Il-sung, founder of the North Korean state and grandfather to current leader Kim Jong-un, set a goal of building long-range missiles to strike Japan—not for striking Japan per se, but for striking American military bases there that would be key to a new Korean conflict. Kim wanted a way to strike bases that would host or coordinate the kind of American airpower that flattened Pyongyang during the war.

Most American bases in Japan are near urban areas, a consequence of Japan’s shortage of useful land. The U.S. Air Force has also closed other bases such as Tachikawa Air Base, which was located in the western part of Tokyo. One base in particular, however, that would very likely be struck by North Korean nuclear weapons is Yokota Air Base.

Yokota Air Base is home to fourteen thousand American servicemen and women. It is home to the headquarters for U.S. Forces Japan and an airlift wing, and is a vital operations, transportation and medical base for the U.S. military in East Asia. It is also the location of the Japan Air Self Defense Force’s Air Defense Command, and a base from which U.S. Air Force B-29 bombers staged attacks on North Korean targets during the Korean War.

In the event of war, some experts are convinced that North Korea would launch a broad nuclear attack designed to shock its enemies, prove a will to use its nuclear arsenal and warn enemies not to provoke further attacks. Yokota, a joint U.S.-Japanese base with a history of hosting attacks against the North Korean people, would almost certainly become a target.

What would happen if Yokota was struck with a North Korean nuclear weapon? Using NUKEMAP, an online tool developed by nuclear-weapons scholar Alex Wellerstein, we can gain some kind of idea. For the purpose of this exercise, we’ll assume North Korea is able to fit a twenty-kiloton nuclear warhead into a medium-range ballistic missile such as the Pukkuksong-2 missile and accurately deliver the weapon to the Yokota Air Base tarmac.

NUKEMAP provides ballpark guesses on a variety of nuclear-weapons effects, including thermal, overpressure and fallout effects, over various distances from the location of the detonation. In the case of Yokota, casualty estimates for a device 25 percent more powerful than the one detonated at Hiroshima are surprisingly mild: 12,800 killed outright and 45,460 injured. While this might seem unusual, the base is fairly large and very few people live or work on the flight line. A swathe of radioactive fallout would fall like a shadow to the northeast, across Saitama Prefecture and towards Ibaraki Prefecture, but generally avoiding metropolitan Tokyo.

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A Secret for 40 Years: Navy Jets Secretly Battled Russian Jets in a Siberian Snow Storm

The Buzz

Tokyo has a population of 13.491 million, making it by far the largest city in Japan and home to more than 10 percent of the nation’s population. The greater Tokyo area, home to thirty-seven million, is the largest urban area on the planet. It is also squarely in the crosshairs of North Korea’s nuclear weapons. In the event of nuclear attack, Tokyo could experience enormous destruction the likes of which it hasn’t experienced since World War II.

Tokyo became the capital of modern Japan in the late nineteenth century, during the Meiji Restoration, part of a broad effort to modernize the country and raise the Japan’s government, science, technology and military to Western levels. Unfortunately, imperialism was one of those imported values, and the country ruled the Korean Peninsula from 1910 to 1945. The occupation and guerrilla war conducted by Korean partisans established a deep antagonism against Japan that persists to this day. The North Korean leadership claims legitimacy in part from the partisan activities conducted by founding members of the state. Japan’s later alliance with the United States and South Korea only exacerbated bad feelings against the country in Pyongyang.

Recommended: Stealth vs. North Korea’s Air Defenses: Who Wins?

Recommended: America’s Battleships Went to War Against North Korea

Recommended: 5 Places World War III Could Start in 2018

Despite such history, in practical terms Japan has only been a secondary player to Pyongyang, with the real enemy being the United States. Kim Il-sung, founder of the North Korean state and grandfather to current leader Kim Jong-un, set a goal of building long-range missiles to strike Japan—not for striking Japan per se, but for striking American military bases there that would be key to a new Korean conflict. Kim wanted a way to strike bases that would host or coordinate the kind of American airpower that flattened Pyongyang during the war.

Most American bases in Japan are near urban areas, a consequence of Japan’s shortage of useful land. The U.S. Air Force has also closed other bases such as Tachikawa Air Base, which was located in the western part of Tokyo. One base in particular, however, that would very likely be struck by North Korean nuclear weapons is Yokota Air Base.

Yokota Air Base is home to fourteen thousand American servicemen and women. It is home to the headquarters for U.S. Forces Japan and an airlift wing, and is a vital operations, transportation and medical base for the U.S. military in East Asia. It is also the location of the Japan Air Self Defense Force’s Air Defense Command, and a base from which U.S. Air Force B-29 bombers staged attacks on North Korean targets during the Korean War.

In the event of war, some experts are convinced that North Korea would launch a broad nuclear attack designed to shock its enemies, prove a will to use its nuclear arsenal and warn enemies not to provoke further attacks. Yokota, a joint U.S.-Japanese base with a history of hosting attacks against the North Korean people, would almost certainly become a target.

What would happen if Yokota was struck with a North Korean nuclear weapon? Using NUKEMAP, an online tool developed by nuclear-weapons scholar Alex Wellerstein, we can gain some kind of idea. For the purpose of this exercise, we’ll assume North Korea is able to fit a twenty-kiloton nuclear warhead into a medium-range ballistic missile such as the Pukkuksong-2 missile and accurately deliver the weapon to the Yokota Air Base tarmac.

NUKEMAP provides ballpark guesses on a variety of nuclear-weapons effects, including thermal, overpressure and fallout effects, over various distances from the location of the detonation. In the case of Yokota, casualty estimates for a device 25 percent more powerful than the one detonated at Hiroshima are surprisingly mild: 12,800 killed outright and 45,460 injured. While this might seem unusual, the base is fairly large and very few people live or work on the flight line. A swathe of radioactive fallout would fall like a shadow to the northeast, across Saitama Prefecture and towards Ibaraki Prefecture, but generally avoiding metropolitan Tokyo.

Pages

The Navy's 4 Most Powerful Battleships Ever Unretired 3 Times (Think North Korea and Russia)

The Buzz

Tokyo has a population of 13.491 million, making it by far the largest city in Japan and home to more than 10 percent of the nation’s population. The greater Tokyo area, home to thirty-seven million, is the largest urban area on the planet. It is also squarely in the crosshairs of North Korea’s nuclear weapons. In the event of nuclear attack, Tokyo could experience enormous destruction the likes of which it hasn’t experienced since World War II.

Tokyo became the capital of modern Japan in the late nineteenth century, during the Meiji Restoration, part of a broad effort to modernize the country and raise the Japan’s government, science, technology and military to Western levels. Unfortunately, imperialism was one of those imported values, and the country ruled the Korean Peninsula from 1910 to 1945. The occupation and guerrilla war conducted by Korean partisans established a deep antagonism against Japan that persists to this day. The North Korean leadership claims legitimacy in part from the partisan activities conducted by founding members of the state. Japan’s later alliance with the United States and South Korea only exacerbated bad feelings against the country in Pyongyang.

Recommended: Stealth vs. North Korea’s Air Defenses: Who Wins?

Recommended: America’s Battleships Went to War Against North Korea

Recommended: 5 Places World War III Could Start in 2018

Despite such history, in practical terms Japan has only been a secondary player to Pyongyang, with the real enemy being the United States. Kim Il-sung, founder of the North Korean state and grandfather to current leader Kim Jong-un, set a goal of building long-range missiles to strike Japan—not for striking Japan per se, but for striking American military bases there that would be key to a new Korean conflict. Kim wanted a way to strike bases that would host or coordinate the kind of American airpower that flattened Pyongyang during the war.

Most American bases in Japan are near urban areas, a consequence of Japan’s shortage of useful land. The U.S. Air Force has also closed other bases such as Tachikawa Air Base, which was located in the western part of Tokyo. One base in particular, however, that would very likely be struck by North Korean nuclear weapons is Yokota Air Base.

Yokota Air Base is home to fourteen thousand American servicemen and women. It is home to the headquarters for U.S. Forces Japan and an airlift wing, and is a vital operations, transportation and medical base for the U.S. military in East Asia. It is also the location of the Japan Air Self Defense Force’s Air Defense Command, and a base from which U.S. Air Force B-29 bombers staged attacks on North Korean targets during the Korean War.

In the event of war, some experts are convinced that North Korea would launch a broad nuclear attack designed to shock its enemies, prove a will to use its nuclear arsenal and warn enemies not to provoke further attacks. Yokota, a joint U.S.-Japanese base with a history of hosting attacks against the North Korean people, would almost certainly become a target.

What would happen if Yokota was struck with a North Korean nuclear weapon? Using NUKEMAP, an online tool developed by nuclear-weapons scholar Alex Wellerstein, we can gain some kind of idea. For the purpose of this exercise, we’ll assume North Korea is able to fit a twenty-kiloton nuclear warhead into a medium-range ballistic missile such as the Pukkuksong-2 missile and accurately deliver the weapon to the Yokota Air Base tarmac.

NUKEMAP provides ballpark guesses on a variety of nuclear-weapons effects, including thermal, overpressure and fallout effects, over various distances from the location of the detonation. In the case of Yokota, casualty estimates for a device 25 percent more powerful than the one detonated at Hiroshima are surprisingly mild: 12,800 killed outright and 45,460 injured. While this might seem unusual, the base is fairly large and very few people live or work on the flight line. A swathe of radioactive fallout would fall like a shadow to the northeast, across Saitama Prefecture and towards Ibaraki Prefecture, but generally avoiding metropolitan Tokyo.

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