The Buzz

China Could Merge High Speed Rail and Nuclear Missiles Into the Ultimate Weapon

China will soon start rolling out its next-generation rail technology across the country, and it is likely the futuristic trains won’t only have passengers on board.

Christened Fuxing, which means “renaissance” or “rejuvenation” in Mandarin, the bullet trains will be able to cruise at 400 kilometres per hour and will replace the slower Hexie (“harmony”) locomotives on the nation’s sprawling 22,000 km high-speed rail network.

The Only Reason America Could Lose the Next Big War

The Pentagon’s military readiness continues to lag even as the prospect of another continuing resolution or government shutdown looms in Washington. Continuing resolutions—which Congress has often passed as temporary measures in place of an actual budget—combined with automatic sequestration budget cuts, cause severe disruptions to military readiness.

'Swarm' Strikes Are the U.S. Military's Worst Fear

Electronic warfare and radio frequency (RF) weapons might be the best way to counter the emerging threat of swarming drone attacks. While in previous years, drones were a tool of state actors, increasingly non-state actors are using these weapons against conventional forces as was recently demonstrated when Russian forces came under attack by more than a dozen ‘home-made’ unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) built by an unknown insurgent group.

Japan Might Have Invented the Ultimate Way to Kill an Aircraft Carrier

Plans to employ bioweapons cannot help but seem especially short-sighted given the indiscriminate and unpredictable nature of diseases. If the attack at Bataan had been carried out, for example, soon-to-be victorious Japanese troops would likely have fallen victim to their own plague. Just as air raids broadly targeting the civilian populations generally proved both cruel and of little military effectiveness during World War II, biological weapons were mostly “useful” for killing civilians.

Tactical Nuclear Weapons: How America Could Have Won the Vietnam War?

The Tet Offensive in 1968 demonstrated what Communist resolve and capacity could achieve with conventional forces. Had nuclear weapons been introduced into the conflict by both sides, the United States would have faced the JASONs’ worst-case scenario. Apparently some talk picked up again about using nukes to relieve the siege at Khe Sanh, but it went as far as similar talk in 1954 about Dien Bien Phu. Despite all the frustration with the war and the desire to pull out the big guns, the nuclear taboo held.

The Navy's New Stealth Destroyer is 98 Percent Complete

Beneath the highly visible shadow of the now commissioned first-in-class stealthy USS Zumwalt destroyer, the Navy has been quietly making rapid progress with its second Zumwalt-class destroyer – the soon-to-be USS Michael Monsoor – slated for delivery as soon as March of this year.

The ship, called DDG 1001, is now 98-percent complete and preparing for builders trails this coming December, Capt. Kevin Smith, DDG 1000 Program Manager, said recently at the Surface Navy Association symposium.

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