The Buzz

Forget the F-22 or F-35: The U.S. Military Really Misses the Old F-14 Tomcat

As Work described it, the Navy was relatively confident it could sink the Oscars and surface ships before they could launch their missiles. They were far less confident about their ability to take out the Tu-22Ms before they could get into launch position. The Tomcats, under Outer Air Battle, would try to “kill the archers”—the Backfires—before they could shoot and attempt to eliminate any cruise missiles that they launched. But, Work notes, no one knows how well it would have worked during a shooting war with the Soviet Union—and it’s a good thing we never got to find out.

Russia's Su-35 vs. America's Stealth F-35: Who Wins in a War for the Sky?

Unlike a Raptor, which was designed from the outset as an air-to-air killer par excellence—the F-35 was not. The Raptor combines a very stealthy airframe with a high altitude ceiling and supersonic cruise speeds in excess of Mach 1.8. Compared to that, the F-35 can  just barely touch Mach 1.6 in full afterburner. Further, the F-22 possesses excellent maneuverability for close-in visual-range dogfights––it crushes the competition in terms of turn rate, radius, angle-of-attack and energy addition at all altitudes.

5 Ways Saudi Arabia Could Crush Iran (or Any Enemy) in a War

The backbone of the Saudi air force is the F-15 fighter: a platform that the United States itself has used for generations and a plane that is capable of carrying out the kinds of short and long-distance air sorties that may be required for a mission to succeed.  According to public sources, Saudi Arabia possesses about 238 F-15 fighter planes—including a 2010 U.S. sale to Riyadh consisting of 84 F-15SA’s,  Boeing Corp’s newest F-15 variant.

Seawolf: The F-22 of U.S. Nuclear Attack Submarines Can Only Be Stopped By One Thing

The extreme quietness of the Seawolf class gave the Navy the idea of modifying the last submarine, USS Jimmy Carter, to support clandestine operations. An extra one hundred feet was added to the hull, a section known as the Multi-Mission Platform (MMP). The MMP gives Carter the ability to send and recover Remotely Operated Vehicles/Unmanned Underwater Vehicles and SEALs and diving teams while submerged.

X-32: The Only Plane That Could Crush the F-35 Is the One That Almost Replaced It

Built to the same specifications, the X-32 and the F-35 had relatively similar performance parameters. Deciding to compete on cost, Boeing designed the X-32 around a single-piece delta wing that would fit all three variants. The X-32 lacked the shaft-driven turbofan lift of the F-35, instead using the same thrust vectoring system as the AV-8 Harrier. The X-32’s system was less advanced than the F-35’s, but also less complex.

Get Ready, Russia and China: The U.S. Military Is Working on a New Aircraft-Killer Missile

The U.S. military has been quietly working on a new long-range air-to-air missile since at least 2016, budget documents reveal.

The Office of the Secretary of Defense spent nearly $10 million in 2016 and 2017 developing concepts and technologies for the so-called “Long Range Engagement Weapon.”

“This project will complete the engineering and design work required to assess a multi-role, long-range interceptor for maintaining air dominance,” according to the military’s 2018 budget proposal. “Details of this project are classified.”

This Is How the U.S. Military Plans to Kill North Korea's Nuclear Missiles

Given the North Korea threat, missile defense upgrades are progressing at a crucial time for the Pentagon’s Ground-Based midcourse defense. Following the completion of  current Pentagon review of nuclear weapons, policy and defenses, there is a distinct possibility that funding for missile defense technology will continue to climb.

The Pentagon’s next intercept test will incorporate new missile defense technology engineered to improve the likelihood that a Ground-Base Interceptor can succeed in destroying an approaching ICBM nuclear weapons attack.

Pages