The Buzz

America's B-29 Superfortress: The Plane That Bombed Japan into Submission

As the Japanese delegation stood on the deck of the battleship USS Missouri on September 2, 1945, preparing to sign the documents that ended World War II, a large formation of Boeing B-29 Superfortress heavy bombers swooped low over Tokyo Bay as a reminder of the terrible destruction that had befallen their nation and turned Japan’s cities into ruins. It was a reminder the Japanese really did not need—the bombed-out rubble and steadily smoking crematories around the country were evidence enough of the violent firestorm that had befallen the Land of the Rising Sun.

FACT: America's Most Powerful Battleships Ever Went to War against North Korea

In the final months of the Second World War, the battleships of the U.S. Navy (USN) ranged across the archipelago of Japan, bombarding industrial, military and logistical targets at will. The Japanese military lacked enough ships, planes and fuel to defend the nation, leaving coastal areas at the mercy of the steel behemoths. Although most of the credit (such that it is) for the destruction of urban Japan belongs to the bombers of the U.S. Army Air Force, the battleships and cruisers of the navy contributed their share.

Russia's Super Strange Kiev-Class Aircraft Carriers: Submarine and Carrier-Killer?

At the tail end of the Cold War, the Soviet Union produced a number of unique aircraft carriers. Known as the Kiev class, the carriers were the Soviets’ initial foray into the world of fixed wing naval aviation, and the only Soviet carriers to become fully operational. The story of the Kiev carriers is also the story of a land power forging a path to become a naval power, seeking to realize a fleet that could challenge the mighty U.S. Navy.

Report: Americans Support Use of Nuclear Weapons If It Saves Lives of U.S. Military

A sizeable majority of the American people are ready to support the use of nuclear weapons if it saves the lives of U.S. military servicemen and women.

That’s according to a new survey conducted by Scott D. Sagan and Benjamin A. Valentino, the results of which were published in the new issue of International Security (Full disclosure: International Security is published by my former employer, the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs).

The Story of How One Tiny Country Held Back the Russia's Mighty Military

The hugely cynical German-Soviet nonaggression pact, concluded in August 1939, assigned the Baltic region of eastern Europe to the exclusive sphere of influence of Communist Russia. Soviet leader Joseph Stalin immediately embarked on a program to annex traditionally Russian-dominated territory in the area, including Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania, to serve as an obstacle to any potential German invasion of the Soviet Union. With good reason, Stalin did not trust Nazi strongman Adolf Hitler to keep his word one second longer than Hitler thought expedient.

The U.S. Navy Has given Us a Glimpse of How It Will Fight High-Tech Wars

The Navy this week put on a two-day show that offered a peek into the future of high-tech combat. And the most important players happened to be robots.

At the 2017 advanced naval technology exercise, or ANTX, the Navy let the drones loose, hoping to demonstrate that robots have reached the point where they can be trusted to help protect ships, spy on enemy submarines and ward off aerial missile attacks.

North Korea Could Unleash the Unthinkable: Nuclear War Between Russia and America

In the event that North Korea tests another Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) or potentially launches an attack on the United States, the Pentagon could try to intercept those missiles with the Ground-Based Midcourse Defense (GMD) system. However, as many analysts have pointed out, the interceptors that miss their target could reenter the Earth’s atmosphere inside Russian airspace.

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