The Buzz

The U.S. Military's Biggest Secret Is Out: How to Kill an F-35

With a missile warhead large enough, the range resolution does not have to be precise. For example, the now antiquated S-75 Dvina—known in NATO parlance as the SA-2 Guideline—has a 440-pound warhead with a lethal radius of more than 100 feet. Thus, a notional twenty-microsecond compressed pulse with a range resolution of 150 feet should have the range resolution to get the warhead close enough—according to Pietrucha’s theory.

Donald Trump Just Made a Big Decision Regarding U.S. Policy Towards Afghanistan

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis is promising that the United States will defeat the Taliban and other terrorist organizations in Afghanistan.

The move comes a day after President Donald Trump delegated authority to the Pentagon to set troop levels in that war-torn nation as it sees fit to achieve America’s military objectives.

“Yesterday afternoon, the President directed the Department of Defense to set troop levels in Afghanistan,” Mattis said in a statement issued June 14.

America's Industrial Might is Working to End the Drone Threat

For more than two decades, the U.S. military owned the skies when it came to the employment of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) or drones. From the tiny, hand-launched Raven and Puma AE (All Environment) to the ubiquitous Predator and its armed cousin, the MQ-9 Reaper and the giant, high altitude RQ-4 Global Hawks, the U.S. developed and deployed an amazing array of UAS. The CIA and military have prosecuted the air campaign against al Qaeda and ISIS largely with armed drones. For a while the U.S. military seemed to have a franchise when it came to unmanned systems.

America's Nuclear Submarines Are So Tough They Can Crash into Mountains and Survive

The heroic actions of the crew were essential to the submarine’s survival. Still, how did a submarine survive a high-speed collision with a mountain? In 1963, immediately after the loss of USS Thresher, the Navy instituted the SUBSAFE program. The goal of the program was to ensure that a submarine’s hull would retain pressure in the event of an accident and she would be able to surface. The Navy’s Nuclear Propulsion Program made safe, resilient nuclear reactors an absolute top priority.

Tank War: Russia's Tough T-90 vs. America's Mighty M-1 Abrams (Who Wins?)

It should be noted that replacing or even developing a new M1A3 variant is not a high priority for the U.S. Army. The Army is being drawn down after the U.S. ground forces were pulled from Iraq and Afghanistan, and with the focus on the Pacific theatre, the service is looking for ways to carve out its niche. Even with Russia’s actions in Ukraine, no one seriously expects the United States to engage in another large conventional land war in the foreseeable future. Thus, the most likely scenario for U.S.

Air War: Could an F-15 Kill a F-35 Stealth Fighter in a Dogfight?

The F-15SA is also equipped with Lockheed Martin’s AN/AAS-42 infrared search and track system. And all of that information from the radar, infrared search and track and the electronic warfare system are fused together—similar to the F-22 and F-35—into a coherent picture. That picture is displayed on large-format color displays that are similar to those found on the F-35—in both the front and rear cockpits.

The U.S. Air Force’s Next Killer Drone Is Disposable

The U.S. Air Force’s latest unmanned aerial vehicle is small, stealthy and cheap enough to be essentially disposable. The Low-Cost Attritable Aircraft, or LCAA, could radically change the way the world’s leading air arm wages war.

The U.S. Defense Department revealed the first LCAA prototype as part of the annual DoD Lab Day, an official even highlighting the work of various military research institutions. A photo accompanying a Lab Day handout depicts an angular, jet-powered drone with a silvery paint job that could have radar-absorbing qualities.

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