Blogs: The Skeptics

Congress Denies Justice to 9/11 Victims' Families

Learning the Limits of American Military Power

A Neoconservative Plan That Will Cripple U.S. Interests

The Skeptics

Fourth, to enable this expansive military-dependent foreign policy, Kagan, Rubin and company write that an “urgent first step” is for the U.S. Congress to “significantly increase U.S. national security and defense spending and eliminate the budgetary straitjacket of the Budget Control Act.” To fund this vision, the American people will have to spend billions more of their tax dollars, increasing the defense budget to do things such as: Pay in blood and treasure to rescue the Baghdad government from ISIS; degrade or defeat the Assad regime in Syria for the benefit of the various Islamic rebel groups; patrol the 1.3 million square miles of the South China Sea to protect all other nations from China; and provide American land, sea and air forces to keep Russia at bay for the benefit of many wealthy and modern European nations.

I am a strong advocate for a powerful military. I want the U.S. Armed Forces to be strong enough to crush any opponent that attacks America, guaranteeing the security of our nation, its citizens and our way of life. I support foreign and domestic policies that best facilitate that objective. International leadership, in my definition, is provided by elected and appointed American officials who interact with the world’s 192 sovereign nations in a constructive way that respects and values others, best protects American interests and facilitates a peaceful global environment.

Force is absolutely a policy option of last resort and is rarely used. That’s how you extend American power.

Daniel L. Davis is a widely published analyst on national security and foreign policy. He retired as a Lt. Col. after twenty-one years in the U.S. Army, including four combat deployments, and is a Foreign Policy Fellow for Defense Priorities and a member of the Center for Defense Information's Military Advisory Board. Follow him on Twitter @DanielLDavis1.

Image: A Sailor directs an EA-6B Prowler.​ Flickr/U.S. Navy

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Congress Is Ignoring Its Most Important Constitutional Duty

The Skeptics

Fourth, to enable this expansive military-dependent foreign policy, Kagan, Rubin and company write that an “urgent first step” is for the U.S. Congress to “significantly increase U.S. national security and defense spending and eliminate the budgetary straitjacket of the Budget Control Act.” To fund this vision, the American people will have to spend billions more of their tax dollars, increasing the defense budget to do things such as: Pay in blood and treasure to rescue the Baghdad government from ISIS; degrade or defeat the Assad regime in Syria for the benefit of the various Islamic rebel groups; patrol the 1.3 million square miles of the South China Sea to protect all other nations from China; and provide American land, sea and air forces to keep Russia at bay for the benefit of many wealthy and modern European nations.

I am a strong advocate for a powerful military. I want the U.S. Armed Forces to be strong enough to crush any opponent that attacks America, guaranteeing the security of our nation, its citizens and our way of life. I support foreign and domestic policies that best facilitate that objective. International leadership, in my definition, is provided by elected and appointed American officials who interact with the world’s 192 sovereign nations in a constructive way that respects and values others, best protects American interests and facilitates a peaceful global environment.

Force is absolutely a policy option of last resort and is rarely used. That’s how you extend American power.

Daniel L. Davis is a widely published analyst on national security and foreign policy. He retired as a Lt. Col. after twenty-one years in the U.S. Army, including four combat deployments, and is a Foreign Policy Fellow for Defense Priorities and a member of the Center for Defense Information's Military Advisory Board. Follow him on Twitter @DanielLDavis1.

Image: A Sailor directs an EA-6B Prowler.​ Flickr/U.S. Navy

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Why Hillary Clinton Will Be a Foreign-Policy Nightmare

The Skeptics

Fourth, to enable this expansive military-dependent foreign policy, Kagan, Rubin and company write that an “urgent first step” is for the U.S. Congress to “significantly increase U.S. national security and defense spending and eliminate the budgetary straitjacket of the Budget Control Act.” To fund this vision, the American people will have to spend billions more of their tax dollars, increasing the defense budget to do things such as: Pay in blood and treasure to rescue the Baghdad government from ISIS; degrade or defeat the Assad regime in Syria for the benefit of the various Islamic rebel groups; patrol the 1.3 million square miles of the South China Sea to protect all other nations from China; and provide American land, sea and air forces to keep Russia at bay for the benefit of many wealthy and modern European nations.

I am a strong advocate for a powerful military. I want the U.S. Armed Forces to be strong enough to crush any opponent that attacks America, guaranteeing the security of our nation, its citizens and our way of life. I support foreign and domestic policies that best facilitate that objective. International leadership, in my definition, is provided by elected and appointed American officials who interact with the world’s 192 sovereign nations in a constructive way that respects and values others, best protects American interests and facilitates a peaceful global environment.

Force is absolutely a policy option of last resort and is rarely used. That’s how you extend American power.

Daniel L. Davis is a widely published analyst on national security and foreign policy. He retired as a Lt. Col. after twenty-one years in the U.S. Army, including four combat deployments, and is a Foreign Policy Fellow for Defense Priorities and a member of the Center for Defense Information's Military Advisory Board. Follow him on Twitter @DanielLDavis1.

Image: A Sailor directs an EA-6B Prowler.​ Flickr/U.S. Navy

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