Blogs: The Skeptics

All of Europe Is a Battleground Against Terrorism

Does Trump Have a Foreign Policy?

Which U.S. Ally Isn't Whining about Being Called a 'Free Rider'?

Obama and the Free-Rider Phenomenon

The Skeptics

Just because the United States expends enormous military resources on the defense of its allies is, of course, not a horrible thing. Indeed, ensuring that America's friends are able to survive aggression or meddling from the Iranians, the Russians, or the North Koreans is as important to the U.S. national security interest as it is to countries like Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Japan, South Korea, Poland and Estonia. In addition, when America’s military resources are expended, Washington increases its diplomatic leverage over the countries that depend upon the U.S. for backup while allowing the U.S. to maintain expand its presence in key regions of the world.

But how much is too much? To President Obama, the United States may have done itself a disservice by believing that America's European, Arab and Asian partners are ready to share more of the burden. The next President of the United States could be grappling with the same reality in another ten months.

Daniel R. DePetris is an analyst at Wikistrat, Inc., a geostrategic consulting firm and a freelance researcher. He has also written for CNN.com, Small Wars Journal and the Diplomat.

Image: Flickr/The White House.

Pages

Kasich's Contradictory Foreign Policy

The Skeptics

Just because the United States expends enormous military resources on the defense of its allies is, of course, not a horrible thing. Indeed, ensuring that America's friends are able to survive aggression or meddling from the Iranians, the Russians, or the North Koreans is as important to the U.S. national security interest as it is to countries like Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Japan, South Korea, Poland and Estonia. In addition, when America’s military resources are expended, Washington increases its diplomatic leverage over the countries that depend upon the U.S. for backup while allowing the U.S. to maintain expand its presence in key regions of the world.

But how much is too much? To President Obama, the United States may have done itself a disservice by believing that America's European, Arab and Asian partners are ready to share more of the burden. The next President of the United States could be grappling with the same reality in another ten months.

Daniel R. DePetris is an analyst at Wikistrat, Inc., a geostrategic consulting firm and a freelance researcher. He has also written for CNN.com, Small Wars Journal and the Diplomat.

Image: Flickr/The White House.

Pages

Pages