Blogs: The Skeptics

Beware Biden’s ‘Trial Balloon’ on Escalation in Syria

The Skeptics

With such ill-defined opponents, the geography of Syria, and the fact other major military deployments have failed to secure American interests, going into Syria would almost certainly result in failure. With Russia militarily supporting Damascus, the potential for unintended clashes with a major world power could turn a disaster into a catastrophe.

Regardless of how much the United States would like to see ISIS eradicated, it must resist attempting to do so using methods that are almost certain to fail—and would likely make the situation deteriorate further. The American Armed Forces are powerful and can accomplish much. But they are not a magic solution for every international problem that exists. In the name of keeping American interests as secure as possible, Americans must firmly resist the temptation to escalate the fight in Syria.

Daniel L. Davis is a widely published analyst on national security and foreign policy. He retired as a Lt. Col. after twenty-one years in the U.S. Army, including four combat deployments. The views in these articles are those of the author alone and do not reflect the position of the U.S. Government. Follow him on Twitter@DanielLDavis1.

Image: Wikimedia Commons/VOA.

Pages

What Davos Missed by Excluding North Korea

The Skeptics

With such ill-defined opponents, the geography of Syria, and the fact other major military deployments have failed to secure American interests, going into Syria would almost certainly result in failure. With Russia militarily supporting Damascus, the potential for unintended clashes with a major world power could turn a disaster into a catastrophe.

Regardless of how much the United States would like to see ISIS eradicated, it must resist attempting to do so using methods that are almost certain to fail—and would likely make the situation deteriorate further. The American Armed Forces are powerful and can accomplish much. But they are not a magic solution for every international problem that exists. In the name of keeping American interests as secure as possible, Americans must firmly resist the temptation to escalate the fight in Syria.

Daniel L. Davis is a widely published analyst on national security and foreign policy. He retired as a Lt. Col. after twenty-one years in the U.S. Army, including four combat deployments. The views in these articles are those of the author alone and do not reflect the position of the U.S. Government. Follow him on Twitter@DanielLDavis1.

Image: Wikimedia Commons/VOA.

Pages

Will Paul Ryan Lead Congress to a New War Authorization?

The Skeptics

With such ill-defined opponents, the geography of Syria, and the fact other major military deployments have failed to secure American interests, going into Syria would almost certainly result in failure. With Russia militarily supporting Damascus, the potential for unintended clashes with a major world power could turn a disaster into a catastrophe.

Regardless of how much the United States would like to see ISIS eradicated, it must resist attempting to do so using methods that are almost certain to fail—and would likely make the situation deteriorate further. The American Armed Forces are powerful and can accomplish much. But they are not a magic solution for every international problem that exists. In the name of keeping American interests as secure as possible, Americans must firmly resist the temptation to escalate the fight in Syria.

Daniel L. Davis is a widely published analyst on national security and foreign policy. He retired as a Lt. Col. after twenty-one years in the U.S. Army, including four combat deployments. The views in these articles are those of the author alone and do not reflect the position of the U.S. Government. Follow him on Twitter@DanielLDavis1.

Image: Wikimedia Commons/VOA.

Pages

Will El Chapo’s Capture Really Disrupt the Flow of Drugs?

The Skeptics

With such ill-defined opponents, the geography of Syria, and the fact other major military deployments have failed to secure American interests, going into Syria would almost certainly result in failure. With Russia militarily supporting Damascus, the potential for unintended clashes with a major world power could turn a disaster into a catastrophe.

Regardless of how much the United States would like to see ISIS eradicated, it must resist attempting to do so using methods that are almost certain to fail—and would likely make the situation deteriorate further. The American Armed Forces are powerful and can accomplish much. But they are not a magic solution for every international problem that exists. In the name of keeping American interests as secure as possible, Americans must firmly resist the temptation to escalate the fight in Syria.

Daniel L. Davis is a widely published analyst on national security and foreign policy. He retired as a Lt. Col. after twenty-one years in the U.S. Army, including four combat deployments. The views in these articles are those of the author alone and do not reflect the position of the U.S. Government. Follow him on Twitter@DanielLDavis1.

Image: Wikimedia Commons/VOA.

Pages

What New Sanctions on Iran Would Cost—And What They Would Achieve

The Skeptics

With such ill-defined opponents, the geography of Syria, and the fact other major military deployments have failed to secure American interests, going into Syria would almost certainly result in failure. With Russia militarily supporting Damascus, the potential for unintended clashes with a major world power could turn a disaster into a catastrophe.

Regardless of how much the United States would like to see ISIS eradicated, it must resist attempting to do so using methods that are almost certain to fail—and would likely make the situation deteriorate further. The American Armed Forces are powerful and can accomplish much. But they are not a magic solution for every international problem that exists. In the name of keeping American interests as secure as possible, Americans must firmly resist the temptation to escalate the fight in Syria.

Daniel L. Davis is a widely published analyst on national security and foreign policy. He retired as a Lt. Col. after twenty-one years in the U.S. Army, including four combat deployments. The views in these articles are those of the author alone and do not reflect the position of the U.S. Government. Follow him on Twitter@DanielLDavis1.

Image: Wikimedia Commons/VOA.

Pages

Pages