Blogs: The Skeptics

Trump’s Message to the DC Foreign-Policy Establishment: 'You’re Fired!'

Obama Is Siding with Saudi Arabia over 9/11 Victims

The Skeptics

The Obama administration seems to be the only entity in town that opposes the passage of JASTA (he is getting an assist from House Speaker Paul Ryan and Sen. Lindsey Graham). White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest remarked on April 18, “It’s difficult to imagine a scenario in which the president would sign the bill as it's currently drafted.” The White House is understandably worried about U.S. citizens or the U.S. government being charged overseas for acts of violence in retaliation. And the Saudis are threatening to sell three-quarters of a trillion dollars of U.S. assets in order to protect themselves from possible litigation down the road. All of this pressure is mounting on President Obama, who has dispatched his national-security team to lobby against a measure that would provide the citizens he represents with the power to gain some small amount of closure.

President Obama is in an unenviable position. He is caught in one of those political traps where any decision he makes will make somebody mad and have an adverse impact on his legacy. Side with the 9/11 families, and Washington’s rupture with Saudi Arabia is likely to sink into an even deeper hole. Side with the Saudis, and President Obama is essentially telling three thousand families who lost a loved one on September 11 to suck it up and stop pursuing financial damages.

As he continues his deliberations on whether or not the White House will become a partner rather than an obstructer of a bipartisan bill, President Obama should keep this fact in the back of his mind: as the commander-in-chief of 324 million Americans, he has a duty and a responsibility to ensure that Americans are afforded justice and that anyone even remotely connected to the single worst terrorist attack in America’s history is held accountable. When you have the opportunity to fix a law that has deprived families from receiving a fair judicial process related to the single greatest slaughter on American soil since Pearl Harbor, you would be derelict not to take that opportunity.

Doubly so if you happen to be the president of the United States.

Daniel R. DePetris is an associate analyst at the Raddington Group. He has also written for CNN.com, Small Wars Journal and the Diplomat.

Image: Flickr/The White House

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More troops, no stability: America’s vicious cycle in Iraq

The Skeptics

The Obama administration seems to be the only entity in town that opposes the passage of JASTA (he is getting an assist from House Speaker Paul Ryan and Sen. Lindsey Graham). White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest remarked on April 18, “It’s difficult to imagine a scenario in which the president would sign the bill as it's currently drafted.” The White House is understandably worried about U.S. citizens or the U.S. government being charged overseas for acts of violence in retaliation. And the Saudis are threatening to sell three-quarters of a trillion dollars of U.S. assets in order to protect themselves from possible litigation down the road. All of this pressure is mounting on President Obama, who has dispatched his national-security team to lobby against a measure that would provide the citizens he represents with the power to gain some small amount of closure.

President Obama is in an unenviable position. He is caught in one of those political traps where any decision he makes will make somebody mad and have an adverse impact on his legacy. Side with the 9/11 families, and Washington’s rupture with Saudi Arabia is likely to sink into an even deeper hole. Side with the Saudis, and President Obama is essentially telling three thousand families who lost a loved one on September 11 to suck it up and stop pursuing financial damages.

As he continues his deliberations on whether or not the White House will become a partner rather than an obstructer of a bipartisan bill, President Obama should keep this fact in the back of his mind: as the commander-in-chief of 324 million Americans, he has a duty and a responsibility to ensure that Americans are afforded justice and that anyone even remotely connected to the single worst terrorist attack in America’s history is held accountable. When you have the opportunity to fix a law that has deprived families from receiving a fair judicial process related to the single greatest slaughter on American soil since Pearl Harbor, you would be derelict not to take that opportunity.

Doubly so if you happen to be the president of the United States.

Daniel R. DePetris is an associate analyst at the Raddington Group. He has also written for CNN.com, Small Wars Journal and the Diplomat.

Image: Flickr/The White House

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Dump Our Double-Dealing, Thuggish 'Allies'

The Skeptics

The Obama administration seems to be the only entity in town that opposes the passage of JASTA (he is getting an assist from House Speaker Paul Ryan and Sen. Lindsey Graham). White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest remarked on April 18, “It’s difficult to imagine a scenario in which the president would sign the bill as it's currently drafted.” The White House is understandably worried about U.S. citizens or the U.S. government being charged overseas for acts of violence in retaliation. And the Saudis are threatening to sell three-quarters of a trillion dollars of U.S. assets in order to protect themselves from possible litigation down the road. All of this pressure is mounting on President Obama, who has dispatched his national-security team to lobby against a measure that would provide the citizens he represents with the power to gain some small amount of closure.

President Obama is in an unenviable position. He is caught in one of those political traps where any decision he makes will make somebody mad and have an adverse impact on his legacy. Side with the 9/11 families, and Washington’s rupture with Saudi Arabia is likely to sink into an even deeper hole. Side with the Saudis, and President Obama is essentially telling three thousand families who lost a loved one on September 11 to suck it up and stop pursuing financial damages.

As he continues his deliberations on whether or not the White House will become a partner rather than an obstructer of a bipartisan bill, President Obama should keep this fact in the back of his mind: as the commander-in-chief of 324 million Americans, he has a duty and a responsibility to ensure that Americans are afforded justice and that anyone even remotely connected to the single worst terrorist attack in America’s history is held accountable. When you have the opportunity to fix a law that has deprived families from receiving a fair judicial process related to the single greatest slaughter on American soil since Pearl Harbor, you would be derelict not to take that opportunity.

Doubly so if you happen to be the president of the United States.

Daniel R. DePetris is an associate analyst at the Raddington Group. He has also written for CNN.com, Small Wars Journal and the Diplomat.

Image: Flickr/The White House

Pages

Syria's Ceasefire Is Falling Apart

The Skeptics

The Obama administration seems to be the only entity in town that opposes the passage of JASTA (he is getting an assist from House Speaker Paul Ryan and Sen. Lindsey Graham). White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest remarked on April 18, “It’s difficult to imagine a scenario in which the president would sign the bill as it's currently drafted.” The White House is understandably worried about U.S. citizens or the U.S. government being charged overseas for acts of violence in retaliation. And the Saudis are threatening to sell three-quarters of a trillion dollars of U.S. assets in order to protect themselves from possible litigation down the road. All of this pressure is mounting on President Obama, who has dispatched his national-security team to lobby against a measure that would provide the citizens he represents with the power to gain some small amount of closure.

President Obama is in an unenviable position. He is caught in one of those political traps where any decision he makes will make somebody mad and have an adverse impact on his legacy. Side with the 9/11 families, and Washington’s rupture with Saudi Arabia is likely to sink into an even deeper hole. Side with the Saudis, and President Obama is essentially telling three thousand families who lost a loved one on September 11 to suck it up and stop pursuing financial damages.

As he continues his deliberations on whether or not the White House will become a partner rather than an obstructer of a bipartisan bill, President Obama should keep this fact in the back of his mind: as the commander-in-chief of 324 million Americans, he has a duty and a responsibility to ensure that Americans are afforded justice and that anyone even remotely connected to the single worst terrorist attack in America’s history is held accountable. When you have the opportunity to fix a law that has deprived families from receiving a fair judicial process related to the single greatest slaughter on American soil since Pearl Harbor, you would be derelict not to take that opportunity.

Doubly so if you happen to be the president of the United States.

Daniel R. DePetris is an associate analyst at the Raddington Group. He has also written for CNN.com, Small Wars Journal and the Diplomat.

Image: Flickr/The White House

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