Blogs: The Skeptics

North Korea Knows Exactly Who Its Target Is

The Skeptics

If Washington hopes to halt the North Korean nuclear program, it will have to address the actual purpose of the North’s activities, and not blame them on some mythical attack on the world. Kim and company are evil, not stupid. They are acting rationally, not foolishly. And convincing them to halt requires a similar approach.

Even then, the United States might not succeed. Indeed, there is little reason to believe that Pyongyang is inclined to yield its existing nuclear weapons under any circumstances. But better to try without having any illusions about the role of the “international community.”

Doug Bandow is a Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute and a former Special Assistant to President Ronald Reagan. He is the author of Tripwire: Korea and U.S. Foreign Policy in a Changed World and co-author of The Korean Conundrum: America’s Troubled Relations with North and South Korea.

Image: Statue of Kim Il-sung and Jong-il in Wonsan, North Korea. Wikimedia Commons/Clay Gilliland

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Should the U.S. Continue to Guarantee the Security of Wealthy States?

The Skeptics

If Washington hopes to halt the North Korean nuclear program, it will have to address the actual purpose of the North’s activities, and not blame them on some mythical attack on the world. Kim and company are evil, not stupid. They are acting rationally, not foolishly. And convincing them to halt requires a similar approach.

Even then, the United States might not succeed. Indeed, there is little reason to believe that Pyongyang is inclined to yield its existing nuclear weapons under any circumstances. But better to try without having any illusions about the role of the “international community.”

Doug Bandow is a Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute and a former Special Assistant to President Ronald Reagan. He is the author of Tripwire: Korea and U.S. Foreign Policy in a Changed World and co-author of The Korean Conundrum: America’s Troubled Relations with North and South Korea.

Image: Statue of Kim Il-sung and Jong-il in Wonsan, North Korea. Wikimedia Commons/Clay Gilliland

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Lessons from FDR's Lend-Lease Program

The Skeptics

If Washington hopes to halt the North Korean nuclear program, it will have to address the actual purpose of the North’s activities, and not blame them on some mythical attack on the world. Kim and company are evil, not stupid. They are acting rationally, not foolishly. And convincing them to halt requires a similar approach.

Even then, the United States might not succeed. Indeed, there is little reason to believe that Pyongyang is inclined to yield its existing nuclear weapons under any circumstances. But better to try without having any illusions about the role of the “international community.”

Doug Bandow is a Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute and a former Special Assistant to President Ronald Reagan. He is the author of Tripwire: Korea and U.S. Foreign Policy in a Changed World and co-author of The Korean Conundrum: America’s Troubled Relations with North and South Korea.

Image: Statue of Kim Il-sung and Jong-il in Wonsan, North Korea. Wikimedia Commons/Clay Gilliland

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The Fallacious Claim of Lacking Air Support in Afghanistan

The Skeptics

If Washington hopes to halt the North Korean nuclear program, it will have to address the actual purpose of the North’s activities, and not blame them on some mythical attack on the world. Kim and company are evil, not stupid. They are acting rationally, not foolishly. And convincing them to halt requires a similar approach.

Even then, the United States might not succeed. Indeed, there is little reason to believe that Pyongyang is inclined to yield its existing nuclear weapons under any circumstances. But better to try without having any illusions about the role of the “international community.”

Doug Bandow is a Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute and a former Special Assistant to President Ronald Reagan. He is the author of Tripwire: Korea and U.S. Foreign Policy in a Changed World and co-author of The Korean Conundrum: America’s Troubled Relations with North and South Korea.

Image: Statue of Kim Il-sung and Jong-il in Wonsan, North Korea. Wikimedia Commons/Clay Gilliland

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What Does the Ceasefire in Syria Mean for U.S.-Russia Relations?

The Skeptics

If Washington hopes to halt the North Korean nuclear program, it will have to address the actual purpose of the North’s activities, and not blame them on some mythical attack on the world. Kim and company are evil, not stupid. They are acting rationally, not foolishly. And convincing them to halt requires a similar approach.

Even then, the United States might not succeed. Indeed, there is little reason to believe that Pyongyang is inclined to yield its existing nuclear weapons under any circumstances. But better to try without having any illusions about the role of the “international community.”

Doug Bandow is a Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute and a former Special Assistant to President Ronald Reagan. He is the author of Tripwire: Korea and U.S. Foreign Policy in a Changed World and co-author of The Korean Conundrum: America’s Troubled Relations with North and South Korea.

Image: Statue of Kim Il-sung and Jong-il in Wonsan, North Korea. Wikimedia Commons/Clay Gilliland

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