Blogs: The Skeptics

Poland’s Plans to Stick Washington With a Bigger NATO Bill

It’s Time to Ask the Hard Questions on Afghanistan

Paranoia and Mystery: Peering Into North Korea

The Skeptics

And the United States should open a dialogue, with the objective of initiating official though low-key relations. A diplomatic presence in Pyongyang would provide a small keyhole for peering into this mysterious country. And tempering hostilities could lead to additional benefits, especially if Kim Jong-un uses next year’s party congress to modernize. Although expectations should be low, Kim emphasized economic development in his New Year’s Day remarks. In contrast, he made no mention of the DPRK’s nuclear program and issued no military threats.

Winston Churchill once said of the Soviet Union that it was “a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.” That certainly describes the DPRK for the West. Kim’s death only makes the puzzle more complex. Increasing contact with Pyongyang is the best way to begin to understand the North and influence its future.

Doug Bandow is a Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute. A former Special Assistant to President Ronald Reagan, he is the author of Tripwire: Korea and U.S. Foreign Policy in a Changed World and co-author of The Korean Conundrum: America’s Troubled Relations with North and South Korea.

Image: Flickr/Clay Gilliland.

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Who Is Responsible For Ending ISIS in Iraq?

The Skeptics

And the United States should open a dialogue, with the objective of initiating official though low-key relations. A diplomatic presence in Pyongyang would provide a small keyhole for peering into this mysterious country. And tempering hostilities could lead to additional benefits, especially if Kim Jong-un uses next year’s party congress to modernize. Although expectations should be low, Kim emphasized economic development in his New Year’s Day remarks. In contrast, he made no mention of the DPRK’s nuclear program and issued no military threats.

Winston Churchill once said of the Soviet Union that it was “a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.” That certainly describes the DPRK for the West. Kim’s death only makes the puzzle more complex. Increasing contact with Pyongyang is the best way to begin to understand the North and influence its future.

Doug Bandow is a Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute. A former Special Assistant to President Ronald Reagan, he is the author of Tripwire: Korea and U.S. Foreign Policy in a Changed World and co-author of The Korean Conundrum: America’s Troubled Relations with North and South Korea.

Image: Flickr/Clay Gilliland.

Pages

We Defeat ISIS. Then What?

The Skeptics

And the United States should open a dialogue, with the objective of initiating official though low-key relations. A diplomatic presence in Pyongyang would provide a small keyhole for peering into this mysterious country. And tempering hostilities could lead to additional benefits, especially if Kim Jong-un uses next year’s party congress to modernize. Although expectations should be low, Kim emphasized economic development in his New Year’s Day remarks. In contrast, he made no mention of the DPRK’s nuclear program and issued no military threats.

Winston Churchill once said of the Soviet Union that it was “a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.” That certainly describes the DPRK for the West. Kim’s death only makes the puzzle more complex. Increasing contact with Pyongyang is the best way to begin to understand the North and influence its future.

Doug Bandow is a Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute. A former Special Assistant to President Ronald Reagan, he is the author of Tripwire: Korea and U.S. Foreign Policy in a Changed World and co-author of The Korean Conundrum: America’s Troubled Relations with North and South Korea.

Image: Flickr/Clay Gilliland.

Pages

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