Blogs

The Shocking Story of the Worst Machine Gun Ever Made

One day at the auction house, someone left a pile of guns on the ground. This was not at all unusual. At the very bottom, wrapped in moving blankets, was a pile of scrap metal. I parted the blanket gently to expose more of whatever I was seeing — gently because the metal had a patina of dirty age and I didn’t want to stick myself.

Job Opening: Assistant Editor

The National Interest is seeking a detail-oriented, creative, results-driven individual to serve as an assistant editor.

This fast-paced position requires working closely with the editor. Pluses are:

• experience with the Chicago Manual of Style

• InDesign and Photoshop proficiency

• experience with web design and Drupal

• familiarity with TNI’s work and the national-security issues that the magazine covers—particularly the Asia-Pacific, Russia, NATO, defense technology and spending, and counterterrorism

The Best (and Most Deadly) Military Rifles, Revolvers and Bullets on the Planet

The standard weapon of the Russian Ground Forces is the AK-74M. Developed in the 1970s as a replacement for the iconic AK-47, the main difference between the two weapons was the use of smaller, lighter 5.45-millimeter ammunition. The weapon, equipped with a thirty-round magazine, saw extensive use in the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan and was issued to frontline Soviet Units, particularly airborne, naval infantry and Germany-based conventional army units. The rifle has a side folding stock, 16.3-inch barrel and an overall length of thirty-seven inches.

Why Russia's Nuclear War Tank Was a Total Failure

In reality, classic heavy tanks stopped making sense by the mid-1950s. Speedy, maneuverable and reliable tanks — with new high-powered guns — would win the wars of the future. Devastating guided missiles capable of punching through heavy armor had also begun entering service. Khrushchev, who loved missiles, had enough of the Soviet army’s penchant for heavy tanks.

In a war that never happened, formations of heavy and rather odd-looking Soviet tanks would have powered through atomic explosions in breakthrough attacks into West Germany.

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