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In 1968, North Korea Captured and Tortured 81 U.S. Sailors (They Kept The Ship as a Trophy)

When the USS Pueblo slipped from its quay in Yokosuka, Japan on January 5, 1968, its crew of eighty-three could not have anticipated that what would have been a routine mission would turn into an eleven month ordeal that would bring the United States and North Korea to the brink of war and back. The Pueblo’s crew would be confronted with a no-win scenario intended to distract from Pyongyang’s recent indiscretions, and further intrigues within the Eastern Bloc.

How Pakistan Is Planning to Fight a Nuclear War

Sandwiched between Iran, China, India and Afghanistan, Pakistan lives in a complicated neighborhood with a variety of security issues. One of the nine known states known to have nuclear weapons, Pakistan’s nuclear arsenal and doctrine are continually evolving to match perceived threats. A nuclear power for decades, Pakistan is now attempting to construct a nuclear triad of its own, making its nuclear arsenal resilient and capable of devastating retaliatory strikes.

Iron Duke: Great Britain's World War I Super Battleship

HMS Iron Duke was the second battleship named after the Duke of Wellington. The first, scrapped in 1906, had the distinction of ramming and sinking HMS Vanguard, another Royal Navy battleship. The second Iron Duke was the name ship of the last class of dreadnoughts to enter Royal Navy service prior to the beginning of World War I. It and its sisters were considered “super-dreadnoughts,” an ill-defined term that distinguishes the second generation of dreadnought battleships from the first.

The Real Reason China Is Desperate to Stop THAAD

Chinese opposition to South Korea’s deployment of the THAAD missile defense system is less about missiles than about an ongoing effort to weaken—and ideally demolish—the United States’ network of formal and informal alliances in Asia that has underpinned the regional order for the last seventy years.

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