A Dubious Partnership; Review of Fred C. Ikle and Sergei A. Karaganov, (co-chairs), Harmonizing the Evolution of U.S. and Russian Defense Policies

At one time conservatives like Castlereagh, nationalists like Bismarck and internationalists like Gladstone were all convinced that international order would be torn apart unless the interests of Great Powers were respected and kept in balance. Th

Issue: Spring 1994

A Dubious Partnership; Review of Fred C. Ikle and Sergei A. Karaganov, (co-chairs), Harmonizing the Evolution of U.S. and Russian Defense Policies (Joint Project of the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Washington, DC and the Council on Foreign and Defense Policy, Moscow, 1993), 43pp.

To realists, it has always been axiomatic that one must deal with those who matter, even when they are least congenial. That paradigmatically realist institution, the nineteenth century Concert of Europe, not only treated war as a legitimate institution (to the outrage of its critics), but had an emphatic Great Power bias. That bias was deemed central to the Concert's aim of reconciling interstate conflict with international order. Conservatives like Castlereagh, nationalists like Bismarck and internationalists like Gladstone were all convinced that international order would be torn apart unless the interests of Great Powers were respected and kept in balance.

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