Another Country, Review of David Horowitz's Radical Son: A Journey Through Our Times

While both Rosenblatt and Horowitz have had second thoughts about the 1960s, their assessments of this fateful decade are strikingly different.

Issue: Fall 1997

Another Country, Review of David Horowitz's Radical Son: A Journey Through Our Times (New York: The Free Press, 1996), and Roger Rosenblatt's Coming Apart: A Memoir of the Harvard Wars of 1969 (Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1997).
Guenter Lewy

On May 1, 1997, the Nation Institute sponsored a meeting at Town Hall in New York City billed as "a look back at the most celebrated and controversial decade of the century"--the 1960s. The program featured some of the decade's most ardent participants, including former Congresswoman Bella Abzug, Daniel Ellsberg of Pentagon Papers fame, and Kathleen Cleaver, formerly communications secretary for the Black Panthers and now a law professor at Cardozo Law School. Not surprisingly, in view of the sponsorship of the meeting, all of the participants celebrated what they regarded as a decade of great promise that unfortunately had not achieved its lofty goals. Transnational corporations, "devoid of life-affirming values", Bella Abzug argued, had succeeded in defeating the Sixties spirit of hope and youthful dynamism. Some suggested that the movement, in a mistake of tactics, had wanted too much too soon; others felt that it had not been radical enough.

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