One Who Made A Revolution, Review of Robert Skidelsky and John Maynard Keynes' The Economist as Saviour 1920-1937

Review of Robert Skidelsky and John Maynard Keynes' The Economist as Saviour 1920-1937(New York: Allen Lane, Penguin Press, 1994).

Issue: Fall 1994

Review of Robert Skidelsky and John Maynard Keynes' The Economist as Saviour 1920-1937(New York: Allen Lane, Penguin Press, 1994).

In his obituary of Maynard Keynes in the American Economic Review in 1946, Joseph Schumpeter said presciently, "Whatever happens to the doctrine, the memory of the man will live--outlive both Keynesianism and the reaction to it." Actually the doctrine has lived on, despite periodic death certificates, much longer than Schumpeter would have liked to think, and yet there is no doubt that the man, Keynes, continues to tower above it, a presence who haunts anyone who ever sought to understand his ambiguous masterpiece--"the most important book on economics in the 20th century," as Nicholas Kaldor called it on its fiftieth anniversary.

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