Don't Let Political Correctness Obstruct the Fight Against Extremism

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May speaks to faith leaders in Finsbury Park Mosque, near rthe scene of an attack, in London, Britain June 19, 2017. REUTERS/Stefan Rousseau/Pool

Wrapping up competing ideologies in one counter-radicalization strategy undermines their complexity and variety.

For those concerned about CVE overreach, thought needs to be given to crafting appropriate metrics in helping trying to assess what ideologies CVE should address. Furthermore, these programs should not all be part of generic, one-size-fits-all strategy. Wrapping up competing ideologies in one counter-radicalization strategy undermines their complexity and variety.

With the arrival of a new administration in the U.S. and a review underway of existing CVE policy, now is the time for the Trump administration to weigh such issues. The momentum seems to be behind government taking an even larger role. Yet it may be time to go back-to-basics and ask what the U.S. actually wishes to achieve from CVE—and what the most effective way of achieving it is.

Robin Simcox is the Margaret Thatcher Fellow in the Davis Institute for National Security and Foreign Policy at the Heritage Foundation.

Image: Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May speaks to faith leaders in Finsbury Park Mosque, near rthe scene of an attack, in London, Britain June 19, 2017. REUTERS/Stefan Rousseau/Pool

Pages