Regime Change Woes: Why Washington Can't Win In North Korea

Intercontinental ballistic missiles are seen at a grand military parade celebrating the 70th founding anniversary of the Korean People's Army at the Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang, in this photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) February 9, 2018. KCNA/via REUTERS

Denuclearization is a worthy goal to pursue, but getting a genuine complete, verifiable, and irreversible disarmament was always going to be a long shot.

In order to prevent war, Washington must belatedly recognize the utter failure of past attempts at regime change, cease considering it as a policy option from henceforth, and recognize that deterrence—which worked on the murderous regime of China’s Mao Tse-tung, the Soviet Union’s barbaric Joseph Stalin, and for the past twelve years on North Korea—will likewise keep the United States safe and prosperous well into the future.

Daniel L. Davis is a senior fellow for Defense Priorities and a former lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army who retired in 2015 after twenty-one years, including four combat deployments. Follow him on Twitter at @DanielLDavis1.

Image: Intercontinental ballistic missiles are seen at a grand military parade celebrating the 70th founding anniversary of the Korean People's Army at the Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang, in this photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) February 9, 2018. KCNA/via REUTERS 

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