Mar-Apr 2009


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Reviews and Essays

Continental Drifts

America and the Continent may find themselves once again a united force to be reckoned with by the rest of the world. But the odds are grim.

Geoffrey Wheatcroft

The Hemispheric Divide

The United States is no longer the master of its hemispheric domain. Gone are the days when Washington could expect Latin America to bow down to its interests. After years of failed foreign and domestic policies, the United States will have to she

Julia E. Sweig

Exodus

Morris turns to the origins of the one-state and two-state conceptions. It helps explain how the Israelis and Palestinians got themselves into this intractable conflict in the first place.

The Laws of War

Stopping torture and changing the policies of the Bush administration may not be enough. With a whole new type of terrorist bred from extraordinary rendition and torture, the last eight years may well prove inescapable.

Expediency of the Angels

Wary of overpromising, the U.S. public has begun to shy away from promoting our values abroad. What's needed is not to abandon idealistic goals, but to pursue them in more pragmatic ways.

Suzanne KatzensteinJack Snyder

Machiavelli Revisited

With great power comes great responsibility. But Washington is adrift and our country in search of a strategy. Foreign-policy heavyweight Les Gelb wittily channels a master to update the classic realpolitik definition of power.

Raising Jihad

Instead of turning back Islamism, military interventions lead large swaths of local populations to pick up arms in defense of their homelands

Curse of the Khyber Pass

Afghanistan is a losing battle. Former-CIA officer Milton Bearden argues the Obama administration should turn to the provinces for answers—and consider arming the militias. Full article 

Milton Bearden

The Three Faces of NATO

One must wonder why, with the end of the cold war, NATO did not dissolve. How do we explain the organization's transformation and vitality at the end of the twentieth century?

Richard K. Betts