Winter 1997-1998


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Reviews and Essays

The Dangers of Expansive Realism

The Clinton administration's conversion from indifference, or even skepticism of NATO, to insistence on NATO expansion was the result of a combination of disparate events and pressures.

Owen Harries

The Prudent Irishman: Edmund Burke's Realism

One of the many consequences of communism's collapse is disarray in the conceptual structures of American foreign policy. Without a clear focal point, one-time hawks now flap like doves, while erstwhile doves behave like birds of prey. The strateg

John R. Bolton

A New Axis: The Emerging Turkish-Israeli Entente

The Turkish-Israeli partnership offers many advantages to the United States. Most ambitiously, it could provide the nucleus of an American-oriented regional partnership made up of democratic allies--as opposed to the authoritarian rulers.

Daniel Pipes

Qu'est-ce qu'une refutation?

Anatol Lieven's article "Qu'est-ce qu'une nation?" (Fall 1997) is, like the curate's boiled egg in the old Punch cartoon, good in parts.

Noel MalcolmAnatol Lieven

Not-So-Innocents Abroad

Gilles Kepel's internationally respected expertise in Islamic matters simply does not extend to their infusion within Western politics and society.

Being Blunt

The book is a novel, one of several by Mr. Banville, and yet as Knopf's classification suggests (and as it seems, in keeping with the literary rage these days), it is not to be taken as a novel only.

Doing Well by Doing Good

Americans have never stopped asking themselves what sets them apart from the rest. Rightly so. America was different in its formative years, and it's different now.

Albania's Cappuccino Coup

The Albanian ex-communists' victory represents a startling success for a coalition of interests that is sure to gain strength and momentum. Today, Albania; tomorrow, other European countries sleepwalking their way to self-destruction.

Jonathan Sunley

Stalin, An Incompetent Realist

Marxists are not alone in stressing that the wellsprings of a state's foreign policy almost always come from its domestic social, economic, and political systems, a perspective that has been reinforced by the recent arguments.