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Boris Yeltsin

Putin's Artful Jurisprudence

Russia's legal reforms centralized power and allowed the creation of informal rules that ensure elite loyalty.

Republican Reckoning

Mismanaged for eight years by the Bush administration, the Republican Party is in peril. Neoconservative table scraps are neither appropriate nor wise. But the GOP has another foreign-policy tradition to which it can turn. Presidents from Eisenhow

The Road to Moscow

Since the end of the cold war, American foreign policy toward Russia has been dismissive of Russian interests. Acknowledging that a country has separate aims does not mean we cannot work toward common goals.

Continental Drifts

America and the Continent may find themselves once again a united force to be reckoned with by the rest of the world. But the odds are grim.

Empire Falls

The United States is in unprecedented decline. Future generations will look back at the past decade as the beginning of the end of American hegemony.

Putin's Third Way

With the rise in oil prices and a conservative fiscal policy, Russia turned from a debtor nation into an economic powerhouse, creating a compromise between the excesses of the free market and the inefficiencies of a command economy

Commentary

Russia's Unpopular Intelligentsia

Democracy-loving Russian intellectuals don't enjoy popular support.

Russia Responds to U.S. by Punishing Orphans

The new antiadoption law harms Russia's interests. It's also plain mean.

Travels with the Russian Tortoise

Is Vladimir Putin more like an American president, an austere Roman emperor or a French head of state?

Books & Reviews

Punditry at the Drive-Thru

Peter Beinart's books represent the intellectual equivalent of what nutritionists call the empty-calorie principle.

America Under the Caesars

Anti-interventionists allege our leaders traded a strong, austere republic for a weak and sprawling empire predicated on a military might that could not match our own ambitions. This narrative negates real threats and real victories.

Exodus

Morris turns to the origins of the one-state and two-state conceptions. It helps explain how the Israelis and Palestinians got themselves into this intractable conflict in the first place.

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April 20, 2014