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Charles Krauthammer

Republican Reckoning

Mismanaged for eight years by the Bush administration, the Republican Party is in peril. Neoconservative table scraps are neither appropriate nor wise. But the GOP has another foreign-policy tradition to which it can turn. Presidents from Eisenhow

Continental Drifts

America and the Continent may find themselves once again a united force to be reckoned with by the rest of the world. But the odds are grim.

Empire Falls

The United States is in unprecedented decline. Future generations will look back at the past decade as the beginning of the end of American hegemony.

A Sit-Down with Brent Scowcroft

The principles of transformationalism—idealism spread by the barrel of a gun—have been central to America’s foreign-policy failings over the last eight years. With a new leadership in power, Washington has a chance to right past wrongs. But that w

Voting Blind

John McCain and Barack Obama are busily offering foreign-policy platitudes on the campaign trail, mostly about spreading freedom, working with allies and hunting down terrorists. But what exactly would they do if elected? Digging ourselves out of

Homeward Bound?

It’s time to rein in America’s crusading zeal and move toward a policy of restraint. We’re suffering from a bad case of foreign-policy overextension, and the only cure is taking a step back to reexamine our global role.

Commentary

Obama Doctrine, Reagan Doctrine

The two presidents take a very similar approach to intervention.

An Israeli Weighs in on the Flotilla

A number of recent events have triggered an awful lot of hypocrisy toward Israel.

Globalist TV

Christiane Amanpour debuted on “This Week” yesterday. Is she headed for her first big failure?

Blogs

Ron Paul and Charles Krauthammer

Neocons worry that libertarian views may take prime time at the GOP convention.

Books & Reviews

Punditry at the Drive-Thru

Peter Beinart's books represent the intellectual equivalent of what nutritionists call the empty-calorie principle.

America Under the Caesars

Anti-interventionists allege our leaders traded a strong, austere republic for a weak and sprawling empire predicated on a military might that could not match our own ambitions. This narrative negates real threats and real victories.

Exodus

Morris turns to the origins of the one-state and two-state conceptions. It helps explain how the Israelis and Palestinians got themselves into this intractable conflict in the first place.

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April 17, 2014