the New York Times Books & Reviews

Uncomfortable, but Invaluable

Urban's is not a happy memoir. The subtitle, My War Within the Cold War, sums up his theme. The new policy involved years of often bitter struggle with both grotesque reactionaries and Western appeasers.

The Other France

 Modernizing the Provincial City does not tell us anything we did not already know about how the French became and are becoming what they have been and are.

Crazy over Cuba

As this important volume demonstrates,  the overriding requirement of the era was not guts but wisdom. On that score, the Kennedys and their lieutenants flunked.

What Combat Does to Man: Private Ryan and its Critics

Saving Private Ryan challenges our moral seriousness, and that is a daunting thing for a summer film to have done.

Acheson, Simply Put

Chace's Acheson is encompassing, graceful and prodigiously researched and annotated.

Globalism and the American Tide

In this new book, Cairncross is a little breathless about the electronic communications that will conjure new worlds into existence. Nevertheless, because her text is well informed and her prose lucid, and because the technological developments ar

Rude Awakening

Fouad Ajami's new book argues that the Arabs have defeated themselves by a blind adherence to anachronistic ideologies of self-glorification, both nationalist and Islamist.

Too Impressive to be Real

Two biographies clarify questions about Sumner Welles' long and spectacular career

Enough Blame to Go Round

H.R. McMaster has written a scathing indictment of America's civilian and military leadership during the early phases of the Vietnam war, and he speaks--to a military audience, at any rate--with unique moral authority.

Hayek's Slippery Slope

Friedrich Hayek's ideas,  particularly those set out in The Road to Serfdom, have been subject to extraordinary ups and downs in learned, as well as in popular and political, estimation.

Follow The National Interest

April 21, 2014