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Foreign relations of the Soviet Union

On War and Choice

It has long been said that there are wars of necessity and wars of choice. But enemies always adapt, especially in our world of terrorists, failing states and delinquent regimes. Every war is a war of choice.

The Federalists Go to Brussels

The European Union’s potential for superpower status has been greatly exaggerated. Brussels has neither the stomach for the job, nor the united purpose to undertake it.

Nuclear Abolition, A Reverie

The hope that we might one day rid the world of nuclear weapons is as old as the technology itself. Atomic destruction has always seemed too great a risk to bear. Yet a nuclear-free world is nothing but a dream—world government, a Praetorian Guard

Arm Wrestling

As Russia and the United States break the armistice, will China play referee?

Non-Proliferation Parody

In the previous issue of The National Interest, John Mueller argued that the threats from nuclear proliferation, nuclear terrorism and nuclear war are exagger

Breaking More Naan with Delhi

The U.S.-India relationship has remained uncannily consistent. How to move ahead on this positive track.

Commentary

A Tale of Two Monasteries

A Christian church service that will either be a breakthrough in relations between Turkey and Armenia, or a disaster for the Turkish liberal elite.

An Israeli Weighs in on the Flotilla

A number of recent events have triggered an awful lot of hypocrisy toward Israel.

Don't Rush START

The dialogue between the administration and the Senate on America’s nuclear force is too important to be hurried along.

Blogs

Victor’s Justice, American Style

The United States acted generously and inclusively after the Cold War ended. Didn't we?

Books & Reviews

America Under the Caesars

Anti-interventionists allege our leaders traded a strong, austere republic for a weak and sprawling empire predicated on a military might that could not match our own ambitions. This narrative negates real threats and real victories.

Exodus

Morris turns to the origins of the one-state and two-state conceptions. It helps explain how the Israelis and Palestinians got themselves into this intractable conflict in the first place.

The Tao of the Arab Center

The Bush administration may have gotten a lot wrong, but there is still hope for America’s policy in the Middle East. Three books shed some light on how the United States can get over Iraq.

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April 18, 2014