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New world order

Surge of the 'Second World'

Those nations falling between the developed West and the world’s poorest countries are jockeying for position in their own regions and playing powers against each other. They will make life increasingly difficult for the reigning great powers.

The Global Power Shift from West to East

Pax Americana and the age of Western dominance are fading. Washington can manage this decline, but first it must acknowledge its reality. History moves forward with a crushing force and does not wait for the unprepared.

A World in Transformation

The world we know is changing. The result is an uneasy mixture of the traditional Westphalian state system and the forces of globalization. Until we find a balance between them, this is a recipe for drift, transition and increasing chaos.

Made in America

America still retains its innovative edge over China and India. But as long as Washington continues to handpick winners and losers, our preeminence is in jeopardy.

Empire Falls

The United States is in unprecedented decline. Future generations will look back at the past decade as the beginning of the end of American hegemony.

A User's Guide to the Century

Jeffrey Sachs explains why the new world order of the twenty-first century is crisis-prone.

Books & Reviews

Strategic Horizons

Despite predictions to the contrary, America's superpower status remains uncontested.

Neo-Conspiracy Theories

There is much room for debate on the soundness of neoconservative policies. But a serious assessment of neocons and their role in the Bush Administration is a necessary starting point.

Power, Wealth and Wisdom

Is the United States really as strong and wise, and "Old Europe" as weak and wooly-headed, as many American foreign policy pundits and practitioners think? Another way to read Transatlantic realities.

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April 18, 2014