Dimitri K. Simes Articles

Republican Reckoning

Mismanaged for eight years by the Bush administration, the Republican Party is in peril. Neoconservative table scraps are neither appropriate nor wise. But the GOP has another foreign-policy tradition to which it can turn. Presidents from Eisenhow

The Road to Moscow

Since the end of the cold war, American foreign policy toward Russia has been dismissive of Russian interests. Acknowledging that a country has separate aims does not mean we cannot work toward common goals.

Putin's Third Way

With the rise in oil prices and a conservative fiscal policy, Russia turned from a debtor nation into an economic powerhouse, creating a compromise between the excesses of the free market and the inefficiencies of a command economy

For God, King and Country

Over the centuries, the causes and justifications for war have evolved. But we remain caught in a Westphalian mindset, even though the nature of today’s substate threats demands an altogether-different mentality and a new breed of soldier—or at le

Notes from the Balkans

The United States should not balk at getting more deeply involved in the volatile Balkans: a well-crafted foreign policy could yield real results.

Israel in NATO?

Such a proposal brings as many complications as it does benefits.

Living Dangerously, Georgian-Style

In a new blog post, TNI Publisher Dimitri K. Simes examines the ongoing crisis between Russia and Georgia—and the damage it could do to U.S.-Russian relations.

Protecting Kosovo at the Expense of New York

In his blog Subjective Evaluation, Dimitri K. Simes disputes former President Clinton's assertion that his administration

From Awakening to War

Without quick mediation, the politicization of religion could lead to conflict.

Religion and the West

American religiosity and European secularity spring from the same source.

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April 20, 2014