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Political science

A Time to Appease

Appeaser! The worst insult to emerge from our political lexicon. As America grapples with exhausting overseas commitments, bringing our might to bear will require a new sort of History lesson.

Japan, LLP

Tokyo has by turns been seen as a promising newcomer, an evil enemy, a dedicated junior partner, a serious economic and technological threat, and now a strategic disappointment. This attitude is detrimental to Washington and Tokyo alike.

All the President's Dreams

President Obama came to office promising a new era in international affairs. So far, he’s been big on rhetoric and has accomplished little. Obama’s inability to prioritize foreign policy risks destroying his presidency.

The Federalists Go to Brussels

The European Union’s potential for superpower status has been greatly exaggerated. Brussels has neither the stomach for the job, nor the united purpose to undertake it.

The Perilous Case of Kim Jong Il

Kim Jong Il is dying. Sons, generals and statesmen vie for his throne. With Pyongyang's impressive arsenal of chemical-, biological- and nuclear-weapons programs, the Fall of the House of Kim could end in a peninsular war or worse.

A Subversive on a Hill

With America mired in two wars and our economy in shambles, the chorus of declinists has returned. But the United States will endure because it is an elastic power.

Commentary

Lessons from the British Empire

Though more enlightened colonialists than many other European powers, the Brits had trouble letting go.

On Their Own Merits

No one should be making any assumptions about the Palestinians’ hearts and minds in coming up with policy.

Two Ships Passing in the Night: The Story of US-Iranian Relations

Even before the Iranian Revolution, Iranians had concerns about US policy toward Iran and since the Revolution both countries have legitimate issues that should be resolved if for no other reason than to enhance security and stability.

Blogs

Sanctions for What?

Sanctions must do more than produce a satisfying feeling in the tummy of people who would like to do bad things to bad regimes.

The (Perpetually) False Promise of International Institutions

It's game, set and match for realism in the latest showdown with the liberals.

Resets and Spheres of Influence

Surprise, Russia and China want their own spheres of influence. Condi Rice couldn't have been more wrong—the age of great-power politics is far from over.

Books & Reviews

America Under the Caesars

Anti-interventionists allege our leaders traded a strong, austere republic for a weak and sprawling empire predicated on a military might that could not match our own ambitions. This narrative negates real threats and real victories.

Missiles Over Tskhinvali

Last summer, Russia and Georgia came to blows. Tbilisi’s pro-American president believed NATO would protect him in a fight with the big, bad bear.

The Soviet Abroad

A book by former–Russian Prime Minister Yevgeny Primakov gives an insider’s account of espionage and intrigue in the Middle East.

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April 17, 2014