Politics of the United States Articles

Israel's Fraying Image

There are growing signs of a divergence in American-Israeli relations and interests. 

The Myth of a Moderate Obama

The president is no pragmatic centrist. In fact, he has the most expansive and leftist vision in the history of the presidency.

The Elusive Obama Doctrine

The president gets solid marks for his handling of a host of tactical challenges. But his Afghan policy proved disjointed, he lacks a clear strategic framework and he has failed to put U.S. economic power at the core of his foreign policy.

Conservative Nation

Declarations of conservatism's demise after the 2008 election were greatly exaggerated. As the opposition, American conservatives are in their element—can they draw upon their intellectual tradition to solve what ails America?

How to Succeed in Politics

The Tea Party movement is blazing its agenda across America. But this is a movement without a cause. If the Whigs, Populists and Feminists can be co-opted by the Democrats and Republicans, this newest third party will suffer the same fate.

Republican Reckoning

Mismanaged for eight years by the Bush administration, the Republican Party is in peril. Neoconservative table scraps are neither appropriate nor wise. But the GOP has another foreign-policy tradition to which it can turn. Presidents from Eisenhow

A Sit-Down with Brent Scowcroft

The principles of transformationalism—idealism spread by the barrel of a gun—have been central to America’s foreign-policy failings over the last eight years. With a new leadership in power, Washington has a chance to right past wrongs. But that w

The Ascension

The creation of Barack Obama’s legacy will play out against three fundamental backdrops: America’s financial crisis; the ability to shore up the power of the United States; and the willingness of Joe Q. Public to spend blood and treasure beyond ou

Foreign Policy, Meet the People

Partisanship used to stop at the water’s edge. But times have changed; the U.S. electorate is now deeply divided—and not just on domestic-policy prescriptions. Facing a rift among the masses greater than that spawned by either the war in Korea or

The Art of the Possible

When a U.S. administration announces unrealistic foreign-policy goals, it sets itself up for failure. Today, we confront a very different international landscape, and the heady days of 2003 permanently belong to the past.

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April 20, 2014