The Buzz

Will the South Korea Summit Lead to Negotiations with North Korea?

As South Korean President Moon Jae-in gears up for a June 29–30 summit with Donald Trump, his ardent desire is to engage North Korea and revive the “sunshine” policies of his progressive predecessors, Kim Dae-jung and Roh Moo-hyun, could be a major source of friction. This sentiment comes at a moment when the United States and the international community are seeking to toughen UN National Security Council sanctions and put maximum pressure on Pyongyang.

America's Next Super Aircraft Carrier Is 50 Percent Complete

HII ship developers have been employing a newer construction strategy for the Kennedy, involving a handful of techniques intended to lower costs and call upon lessons learned from the building of the first Ford-class carrier.

The 2nd US Navy Ford-Class high-tech aircraft carrier has grown 70-feet longer and is now 50-percent structurally complete with the addition of the lower stern, Huntington Ingalls Industries announced.​

Congress Has a Bold Plan for a 355 Ship U.S. Navy

U.S. Senator Roger Wicker, R-Miss., and Congressman Rob Wittman, R-VA, have announced that they are putting forward new legislation that would codify the U.S. Navy’s requirement for 355 ships. The service currently has 276 ships in its battle fleet.

“They [the United States Navy] have come back to us with a new requirement based on the threat that we have and they have told us the requirement for the size of our Navy fleet is 355 ships,” Wicker told reporters during a press conference on June 22.

Could America Really Stop a North Korean ICBM?

While the initial development of MOKV is aimed at configuring the “kill vehicle” for a GBI, there is early thinking about integrating the technology onto a Standard Missile-3, or SM-3, an interceptor missile also able to knock incoming ICBMs out of space. The SM-3 is also an exo-atmopheric "kill vehicle," meaning it can destroy short and intermediate range incoming targets; its "kill vehilce" has no explosives but rather uses kinetic energy to collide with and obliterate its target.

5 Weapons Russia and America Would Have Used in a Superpower War

The Chieftain was an evolution of the Centurion tank, which had appeared at the end of World War II.  Chieftain had considerably better armor than the Centurion and an improved engine. What really stood the tank apart from its contemporaries, however, was the 120mm main gun. The L11A5 rifled gun was much larger and more powerful than the 105mm gun equipping American M60 tanks and 115mm gun equipping Soviet T-62 tanks.

Why Russia's Armata Tank May Never Be a Threat to NATO

Even if the Armata was as dangerous as the British report claims, Russia is not likely to be able to afford the expensive new machine in the huge quantities. Using the British reports own numbers—120 Armata tanks produced per year—CNA Corporation research scientist Mike Kofman, a prominent Russian military affairs expert in Washington, noted it would take nearly 21 years to replace Russia’s 2500 operational tanks with T-14s. That’s if the Kremlin has the financial wherewithal to buy that many Armata tanks—which is somewhat dubious.

Pages