The Buzz

This Is What Happens When a Russian Nuclear Submarine Slams into a U.S. Sub

How did this accident even happen? Some articles in the press characterized the subs as having been involved in a cat-and-mouse game that had gone too far. Indeed, such games were common between the attack submarines of rival nations, and had resulted in collisions in the past.

However, that account remains unlikely because a submarine can only play a cat-and-mouse game if it is able to detect the other ship. And in the shallow waters off of Kildin Island, it is unlikely either vessel could.

The U.S. Navy Has a New Way to Protect Its Aircraft Carriers from Enemy Missiles

The new radar, called the Enterprise Air Surveillance Radar is slated to go on the now-under-construction USS Kennedy (CVN 79), as well as several of the services’ amphibs.

The Navy plans to test and operate a new, highly-sensitive ship-defense radar technology on its 2nd Ford-Class aircraft carrier -- to detect incoming enemy fire, anti-ship cruise missiles and airborne threats such as attacking drones, fixed-wing aircraft or helicopters.

The F-23: The Slick Fighter Plane that Could Have Replaced the F-22

The final operational version of the F-23 would have offered much better range than the Raptor—especially at supersonic speeds—especially if powered by the YF120. That would have come in handy over the Pacific. It would also have been stealthier and it would have been almost as maneuverable as the Raptor—or possibly more so at different speeds and altitudes.

In 1991, Lockheed won the Advanced Tactical Fighter (ATF) competition and went on to develop the stealthy world beating F-22 Raptor air superiority fighter.

Why America Simply Can't Build Anymore F-22 Raptors

The Raptor’s avionics were dated even before the jet was declared operational in December 2005. While the Raptor is the most advanced operational warplane in the Air Force’s inventory, its computer architecture dates back to the early 1990s. The core processors run at 25MHz–since it took so long to get the jet from the design phase to production. Moreover, the Raptor’s software is particularly obtuse and difficult to upgrade–which is partly why integrating the AIM-9X and AIM-120D missiles onto the aircraft has been so problematic.

Russia's Very Own A-10: Meet the Su-25 Frogfoot

With the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Su-25s were passed onto the air services of all the Soviet successor states. Those that didn’t use Su-25s in local wars—on both sides of the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict, for example—often exported them to countries that did. Frogfoots have seen action in the service of Macedonia (against Albanian rebels), Ethiopia (against Eritrea, with one shot down), Sudan (target: Darfur), and Georgia versus Abkhazian separatists that shot down several. And that list is not comprehensive.

North Korea Tried to Copy 'James Bond' (It Almost Started World War III)

The ten-ton Improved Submersible Infiltration Landing Craft looks like it belongs in a James Bond movie. Basically a nearly thirteen-meter-long low-riding motorboat coated in antiradar paint, it can submerging three meters deep while under power, exposing just the crew cab and a folding snorkel mast (likely the “antenna” observed by the guard post). Unlike an earlier predecessor captured in the 1980s, however, the I-SILC can fully submerge twenty to twenty-five meters deep to avoid detection, but lacks an electric motor to swim underwater.

Why America Should Fear China's Submarine Fleet

Te large-scale buildup of China’s naval forces is the most visible part of a major rearmament campaign that has been under way for more than a decade. But Chinese development of modern and increasingly quiet submarines poses one of the more serious strategic challenges for the United States and other nations concerned about Beijing’s growing hegemony in Asia.

The increasing size of the People’s Liberation Army Navy fleet of surface vessels captures most international attention, based on the sheer numbers and advanced weapons on an array of new warships.

B-52 Weapons Upgrade to Add More Payload, Radar, Range of Weapons & Possible Engine

Known for massive bombing missions during the Vietnam War, the 159-foot long B-52s have in recent years been operating over Afghanistan in support of military actions there from a base in Guam.

The B-52 also served in Operation Desert Storm, Air Force statements said.  “B-52s struck wide-area troop concentrations, fixed installations and bunkers, and decimated the morale of Iraq's Republican Guard,” an Air Force statement said.

Why the U.S. Navy's America-Class Amphibious Assault Ships are Real Wonder Weapons

The Navy is acquiring early materials, working on systems engineering and starting detailed design work for a new America-Class Amphibious Assault ship which re-introduces “well-deck” surface attack technology to prepare the service for future amphibious warfare.

Construction of the ship, LHA 8 (Bougainville), is scheduled to commence in late 2018 with delivery planned to occur in 2024, Colleen O’Rourke, spokeswoman for Naval Sea Systems Command, told Scout Warrior in a written statement.

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