Ideology Books & Reviews

Tracing China's Long Game Plan

Many Western observers think China is due to liberalize as it rises. Yet Chinese reformers have long favored Western ideas merely as a means to a different end: wealth and power.

The Fallacy of Human Freedom

Faith in progress and the perfectibility of human nature are at the center of Western thought. What if this faith is misplaced?

Lifting the Veil on North Korea

Is North Korea an irrational state or a survivor against all odds?

Pinstripe Warriors

Two recent books explore the enduring dichotomy between diplomats and soldiers and pose questions for the future of effective diplomacy.

The Revenge of Kaplan's Maps

Kaplan explores the potent role of geography in shaping the survival instincts and geopolitical sensibilities of nations and peoples in The Revenge of Geography.

The Man They Called Ibn Saud

Michael Darlow and Barbara Bray’s biography probes the life of Abdul Aziz Ibn Saud, a giant of a man with a powerful force of personality, forged the often-warring tribes of the Arabian Peninsula into the country of Saudi Arabia.

Beinart's Quest to Save Zionism

How can an Israeli PM mobilize U.S. politicians against a U.S. president committed to Israeli interests? Beinart's provocative answer: U.S. Jewish leaders commandeered Jewish organizations and turned them into agencies for Likud interests.

Death by Irrelevance

Rockefeller, Lindsay, Scranton—just three of the “moderates” who failed to keep the GOP from the clutches of Goldwater and Nixon. Geoffrey Kabaservice laments their defeat with a wistfulness that obscures from him their true frustration.

Schemes That Set the Desert on Fire

After WWI, Britain and France made the Arab world the object of history, not its subject. James Barr’s new book shows that the Middle East was born crazy. Later misunderstandings and manipulations were laid atop well-worn grooves.

Lest Ye Be Judged

Enraged bloggers and grandstanding politicians alike denounce the Koran as a glorified terrorist manifesto. Philip Jenkins’s new tome challenges this simplistic logic, analyzing the Bible’s equally—and often shockingly—bloodthirsty passages.

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April 16, 2014