America Just Ran Out Of Aid to Send to Ukraine to Fight Russia

M1 Abrams SEPv3
January 23, 2024 Topic: Security Region: Europe Blog Brand: The Buzz Tags: RussiaUkraineWar In UkrainePutinRussian Military

America Just Ran Out Of Aid to Send to Ukraine to Fight Russia

It was on December 27 of last year that the Pentagon announced its last security assistance package for Ukraine. It included 155mm artillery rounds, Stinger anti-aircraft missiles and other "high-demand" items, which were all drawn from existing U.S. stockpiles.

 

End Of U.S. Aid for Ukraine – What Does It Mean for Kyiv? On Tuesday in Brussels, NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg announced a new $1.2 billion joint contract to buy more than 222,000 rounds of 155 mm ammunition for Ukraine, The Associated Press reported. The rounds are some of the most heavily used munitions in the ongoing conflict between Ukraine and Russia, and the contract will be used to backfill allies that have pushed their own reserves to Kyiv.

"This demonstrates that NATO's tried and tested structures for joint procurement are delivering," said the Secretary General via a statement. "Russia's war in Ukraine has become a battle for ammunition, so it is important that Allies refill their own stocks, as we continue to support Ukraine."

 

Allied leaders agreed to NATO's Defence Production Action Plan in July 2023, and since that time the NATO Support and Procurement Agency (NSPA) has agreed to contracts for around $10 billion worth of ammunition. Recent NSPA purchases also include a $5.5 billion contract for 1,000 Patriot missiles and $4 billion for 155-mm artillery, anti-tank guided missiles and tank ammunition.

In November 2023, NATO's procurement agency also opted to buy six E-7A Wedgetail aircraft with a contract to be signed in 2024.

End of the Line For U.S. Aid to Ukraine? For Now

While NSPA is continuing to provide support for Kyiv, it was also this week that the Pentagon announced that it has no additional funds to send – yet, Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin still called for continued international support on Tuesday. These were the first public remarks made by Austin since his release from a two-week hospitalization for complications from surgery to treat prostate cancer.

"Let's be clear. Our support for Ukraine's struggle against tyranny makes all of our countries more secure. If we lose our nerve, if we flinch, if we fail to deter other would-be aggressors, we will only invite even more bloodshed and more chaos," said Austin during the monthly gathering of about 50 nations that have supplied military aid to Ukraine.

"We must not waver in our support for Ukraine," the DoD chief added, and called upon U.S. allies to send more ground-based air defense systems and interceptors.

Austin's comments came hours after Russia launched a barrage of more than 40 ballistic, cruise, anti-aircraft and guided missiles into Ukraine's two largest cities. Though Ukrainian air defenses were able to intercept at least 21 missiles, at least five people were killed, and numerous civilian building damaged in the attack. Nearly dozen individuals were also injured in the recent strikes.

The assault came a day after Moscow rejected a deal backed by Kyiv and the West to end the nearly two-year-long war.

Final $250 Million

It was on December 27 of last year that the Pentagon announced its last security assistance package for Ukraine. It included 155mm artillery rounds, Stinger anti-aircraft missiles and other "high-demand" items, which were all drawn from existing U.S. stockpiles.

The U.S. is now unable to provide any additional aid as Congress would need to approve additional funding. More than $110 billion in aid for Ukraine, Taiwan and Israel remains stalled over disagreements between Congress and the White House over other policy priorities, notably additional security for the U.S.-Mexico border.

Ukraine War

Author Experience and Expertise: Peter Suciu

Peter Suciu is a Michigan-based writer. He has contributed to more than four dozen magazines, newspapers, and websites with over 3,200 published pieces over a twenty-year career in journalism. He regularly writes about military hardware, firearms history, cybersecurity, politics, and international affairs. Peter is also a Contributing Writer for Forbes and Clearance Jobs. You can follow him on Twitter: @PeterSuciu. You can email the author: [email protected].