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Here's Why You Don't Mix LSD and Nuclear-Powered Aircraft Carriers

April 24, 2019 Topic: Secuity Blog Brand: The Buzz Tags: LSDDrugsU.S. NavyNavyMilitaryTechnologyWorld

Here's Why You Don't Mix LSD and Nuclear-Powered Aircraft Carriers

This can't be good. 

But the fact that these LSD rings popped up in the first place isn't surprising at all. As I previously wrote, the middle of nowhere is the same kind of boring and awful whether it's patrolling the Pacific or guarding nuclear silos in America's heartland.

A sailor assigned to the nuclear reactor department aboard the USS Ronald Reagan admitted to bringing LSD aboard the aircraft carrier, Navy Times reports.

(This first appeared several months ago.)

In a copy of a plea deal obtained by Navy Times, Machinist's Mate (Nuclear Power) 3rd Class Philip S. Colegrove said he "wrongfully" brought the powerful hallucinogen aboard the Reagan while docked at various ports across Japan, as though there's a right way to bring acid into the heart of a nuclear-powered warship.

The recent guilty pleas from Colegove and Electrician's Mate (Nuclear Power) 2nd Class Sean M. Gevero bring the total number of Reagan nuclear reactor sailors disciplined in connection to "LSD abuse" aboard the Reagan to four, per Navy Times. A fifth is currently awaiting an Article 32 hearing

Ten other sailors, all from the same department, already faced administrative discipline last year for possessing and distributing LSD in connection to a drug ring aboard the nuclear aircraft carrier

The prevalence of LSD in a critical nuclear-related facility is surprisingly not confined to the Navy: In May 2018, 14 airmen from the Air Force security units at F.E. Warren Air Force Base in Wyoming tasked with safeguarding nuclear missile silos were disciplined for dropping acid between shifts.

But the fact that these LSD rings popped up in the first place isn't surprising at all. As I previously wrote, the middle of nowhere is the same kind of boring and awful whether it's patrolling the Pacific or guarding nuclear silos in America's heartland.

Anyway, if anyone has any insights into the right way to bring LSD into your (potentially radioactive) place of work, give me a shout — for, uh, science.

This article originally appeared at Task & Purpose. Follow Task & Purpose on Twitter.

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