Ukraine Could Lose the War to Russia: Kyiv Needs More Artillery Shells and Missiles

U.S. Army M109 Artillery

Ukraine Could Lose the War to Russia: Kyiv Needs More Artillery Shells and Missiles

After several months of frustrating inaction due to a deadlock caused by a small number of lawmakers, the House passed the big foreign aid bill that will affect Ukraine, Israel, and Taiwan.

 

After several months of frustrating inaction due to a deadlock caused by a small number of lawmakers, the House passed the big foreign aid bill that will affect Ukraine, Israel, and Taiwan.

Ukraine is slotted to receive over $60 billion in security aid with the new law, which still has to pass from the Senate.

 

Ukraine primarily, but with Taiwan following closely behind, desperately need the military aid to bolster their capabilities. Indeed, the situation in Ukraine without further U.S. security aid would be very dire indeed.

Ukraine Needs Arms Yesterday 

Several senior national security officials have warned that Ukraine might lose the war if it doesn’t receive further security aid soon.

In a rare public acknowledgment of the situation, CIA Director Joe Burns admitted that the war might end in Russia’s favor if Kyiv doesn’t receive the necessary means to fight back, including artillery, air defense weapon systems, munitions, and long-range missiles.

“With the boost that would come from military assistance, both practically and psychologically, Ukrainians are entirely capable of holding their own through 2024 and puncturing Putin’s arrogant view that time is on his side,” the CIA director said during an event at the George W. Bush Presidential Center last week.

The situation for the Ukrainian forces without further U.S. military aid would be dire indeed.

 “There is a very real risk that the Ukrainians could lose on the battlefield by the end of 2024, or at least put Putin in a position where he could essentially dictate the terms of a political settlement,” Burns stated.

But Burns isn’t the only one ringing the alarm bell for Ukraine. The most senior military officials, including Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Air Force General C. Q. Brown, have also expressed the urgent need for Ukraine for American weapon systems and munitions.

While U.S. lawmakers were debating the issue, several European nations stepped up and committed billions of dollars worth of weapon systems and munitions to Ukraine. France and French President Emmanuel Macron, in particular, finally made a more firm stance on the war and against Russian aggression.

It’s Not Just About Ukraine 

But, as with many other things concerning a world power, what happens in Ukraine is much more than just Ukraine. 

U.S. partners, allies, and adversaries pay close attention to how the U.S. is acting in Ukraine and to the extent it’s willing to support the embattled nation. 

China, in particular, is paying close attention because the way Washington D.C. treats Ukraine would be useful for comparing with how it would treat Taiwan in the event of a Chinese invasion of the island nation.

“It’s also about Xi Jinping in China, his ambitions, and our allies and partners in the Indo-Pacific,” the CIA director added. “This is really a question of whether or not our adversaries understand our reliability and determination and whether our allies and partners understand that as well.”

About the Author

Stavros Atlamazoglou is a seasoned defense and national security journalist specializing in special operations. A Hellenic Army veteran (national service with the 575th Marine Battalion and Army HQ), he holds a BA from the Johns Hopkins University, an MA from the Johns Hopkins’ School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). He is pursuing a J.D. at Boston College Law School. His work has been featured in Business Insider, Sandboxx, and SOFREP.