Poll: 66% of Republicans Don’t Think Biden’s Election Win Was Legitimate

Poll: 66% of Republicans Don’t Think Biden’s Election Win Was Legitimate

A majority of Republicans do not believe that President Joe Biden’s victory in the 2020 presidential election was legitimate, according to a new poll.

 

A majority of Republicans do not believe that President Joe Biden’s victory in the 2020 presidential election was legitimate, according to a new poll.

The poll, released by Quinnipiac University on Wednesday, found that 66 percent of Republican participants said that Biden’s election victory was not legitimate, while 25 percent of Republicans said it was legitimate. 

 

Among all poll participants, 64 percent said Biden’s victory was legitimate, while 29 percent said it was not.

The poll’s results come months after former President Donald Trump’s supporters stormed the Capitol building on Jan. 6, arguing that the 2020 presidential election results were “rigged” against Trump and “stolen.”

Another poll released this week found that 56 percent of Republicans believe the election was rigged or the result of illegal voting and 53 percent think Trump is still the rightful president.

According to the Quinnipiac poll, 66 percent of Republicans would like to see Trump run again after experiencing defeat in the 2020 presidential election and 85 percent of Republicans polled said they would prefer to see candidates running for office that mostly align and agree with Trump.

“The numbers fly in the face of any predictions that Donald Trump’s political future is in decline. By a substantial majority, Republicans: (1) believe the election was stolen from him, (2) want Trump to run again, and (3), if they can’t vote for Trump, prefer someone who agrees with him,” Tim Malloy, Quinnipiac University polling analyst, said.

The poll’s findings indicate that Trump still maintains an iron-like grip over the GOP, despite his inability to digitally communicate with voters as the former president has been banned either temporarily or permanently from major social media platforms like Twitter and Facebook for his involvement in the insurrection on the Capitol.

Trump has also been committed to winning back the House and Senate in the 2022 midterm elections, as he’s endorsed a number of candidates and is expected to host several political rallies.

The former president has been reportedly working with former Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) to craft a new policy agenda and has sat down with former White House chief of staff Mark Meadows and Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) at Mar-a-Lago in recent weeks as Republicans pivot their focus on gaining seats in both congressional chambers.

The Quinnipiac University poll surveyed 1,316 adults between May 18 and 24 with a margin of error of 2.7 percent.

Rachel Bucchino is a reporter at the National Interest. Her work has appeared in The Washington Post, U.S. News & World Report and The Hill.